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Hepatitis C

CROI 2014: Interferon-free BMS Combo Cures 90% of Genotype 1 Hepatitis C

An all-oral regimen of daclatasvir, asunaprevir, and BMS-791325 -- without interferon or ribavirin -- led to sustained response in approximately 90% of previously untreated hepatitis C patients, most with hard-to-treat genotype 1a, according to a study presented at the 21st Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2014) this month in Boston.

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CROI 2014/APASL 2014: Merck Combo Suppresses HCV in Monoinfected and Coinfected Patients

An all-oral combination of the HCV protease inhibitor MK-5172 and the NS5A inhibitor MK-8742, with or without ribavirin, demonstrated promising end-of-treatment viral suppression in HIV/HCV coinfected patients and high cure rates in people with hepatitis C alone, according to findings from the C-WORTHY study presented at recent conferences.

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CROI 2014: Daclatasvir + Simeprevir Effective Against Hepatitis C Genotype 1b

An all-oral regimen of daclatasvir plus simeprevir, without interferon or ribavirin, led to sustained response in 85% to 95% of patients with hepatitis C genotype 1b, but this combination did not work well against genotype 1a, researchers reported last week at the 21st Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2014) in Boston.

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APASL 2014: Latest Hepatitis C Treatments Offer Good News for HIV/HCV Coinfected People

People coinfected with HIV and hepatitis C are at risk of faster liver disease progression, so they stand to benefit even more from new direct-acting antiviral therapies that could cure hepatitis C as effectively and be equally well-tolerated in HIV/HCV coinfected and HCV monoinfected patients, Gregory Dore said at the 23rd Conference of the Asian Pacific Association for the Study of the Liver (APASL 2014) last week in Brisbane.

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CROI 2014: Simeprevir Cures Almost 80% of First-time HIV/HCV Coinfected Patients

The next-generation hepatitis C protease inhibitor simeprevir (Olysio) cured nearly 80% of previously untreated people with hepatitis C and HIV coinfection when used in combination with pegylated interferon and ribavirin, Douglas Dieterich of Mt. Sinai Medical Center reported on Tuesday at the 21st Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2014) in Boston.

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Hepatitis C Liver Decompensation Remains a Problem for People with HIV Despite Good ART

People with HIV who are coinfected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) continue to have a higher risk for decompensated cirrhosis, or liver failure, even in the era of effective antiretroviral therapy (ART), according to a study published in the March 18 Annals of Internal Medicine. As such, they especially stand to benefit from new interferon-free hepatitis C treatments.

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CROI 2014: AbbVie 3D Combination Cures 99% of Genotype 1b Hepatitis C

A 12-week triple combination of direct-acting antivirals developed by AbbVie cured at least 99% of previously untreated people with genotype 1 hepatitis C infection, Rajendar Reddy of the University of Pennsylvania Hospital told the 21st Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2014) in Boston on Tuesday. This is expected to be the first approved interferon- and ribavirin-free combination for genotype 1b, available by the end of 2014.

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New U.S. Hepatitis C Survey Suggests Lower Prevalence, Higher Mortality

An estimated 2.7 million people in the U.S. have chronic hepatitis C, substantially lower than previous estimates, according to an analysis from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey(NHANES) published in the March 4 edition of Annals of Internal Medicine. This figure may be an underestimate, however, as the household survey does not include higher-risk populations including homeless and incarcerated people.

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CROI 2014: Short 6-Week Oral Treatment Works for Most Hepatitis C Patients

Interferon- and ribavirin-free treatment using sofosbuvir, ledipasvir, and a third drug for as little as 6 weeks can cure a majority of previously untreated people with genotype 1 hepatitis C, including those with traditional predictors of poor response, according to results from the SYNERGY trial presented at the 21st Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2014) this week in Boston.

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