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HIV11: Lipid Levels Are Higher among HIV+ People on ART, Immune Suppression May Play a Role

People with HIV on suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART) have "considerably higher" blood lipid levels relative to untreated individuals or those on less effective treatment, researchers reported at the 11th International Congress on Drug Therapy in HIV Infection (HIV11) last month in Glasgow. They also found that greater immune deficiency, as indicated by lowest-ever CD4 count, was associated with lipid elevations.

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Study Finds Increased Fractures in First 2 Years after Starting Antiretroviral Treatment

HIV positive individuals appear to have significantly increased risk of bone fractures during the first 2 years after beginning antiretroviral therapy (ART), but the risk returned to baseline levels thereafter, according to a study published in the November 2012 issue of the journal AIDS.

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Liver Toxicity Uncommon with Modern Antiretroviral Drugs, but Higher Risk for HIV/HCV Coinfected

Recently approved antiretroviral drugs are generally well-tolerated and seldom cause serious liver enzyme elevations, although protease inhibitors are somewhat more likely to do so, researchers reported in the November 28, 2012, advance online edition of AIDS. People with HIV/HCV coinfection are more likely to experience liver toxicity, however, and early hepatitis C treatment may improve the tolerability of HIV therapy.alt

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HIV Suppression is More Likely if Antiretroviral Treatment Starts When Viral Load is Low

People who start antiretroviral therapy (ART) with a baseline HIV RNA level below 100,000 copies/mL have a better chance of achieving undetectable viral load during their first year on treatment, according to a meta-analysis of more than 20 studies published in the November 22, 2012, advance edition of HIV Medicine, the journal of the British HIV Association. alt

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HIV11: New Studies Challenge Evidence of Reduced Abacavir Potency When Viral Load Is High

An analysis of 2 studies of the new HIV integrase inhibitor dolutegravir presented at the 11th International Congress on Drug Therapy in HIV Infection this month in Glasgow had the incidental effect of bringing into question evidence from a previous study suggesting that the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor abacavir (Ziagen, also in the Epzicom or Kivexa coformulation) was less potent in people starting HIV therapy with high viral loads than another NRTI drug, tenofovir (Viread, also in the Truvada, Atripla, Complera, and Stribild coformulations). alt

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HIV Medical Providers Call for Fair Drug Pricing to Expand Access to Treatment

Practitioners from the American Academy of HIV Medicine (AAHIVM) and the HIV Medicine Association (HIVMA) delivered a joint statement to pharmaceutical company executives this week, asking the industry to reconsider its pricing for antiretroviral drugs so that more people in the U.S. and worldwide are able to access treatment. alt

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UNAIDS Reports Progress, PEPFAR Blueprint Looks Towards AIDS-free Generation

The latest global report from UNAIDS, release ahead of World AIDS Day on December 1, highlights progress in stemming the epidemic, including lower rates of new infection in many countries and a growing proportion of HIV positive people on antiretroviral treatment. Continued progress requires adequate funding, however. To that end, U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton this week released a "Blueprint" detailing recent advances and future plans for achieving a generation free from AIDS.alt

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