Back HIV/AIDS HIV/AIDS Topics HIV Treatment

June 5 Marks 35 Years Since First Report of AIDS

Sunday, June 5th marks the 35th anniversary of the first report of what would come to be known as AIDS. The past 3 decades have included remarkable progress in the field -- including highly effective antiretroviral therapy and a pill that can prevent HIV infection -- but much remains to be done to make these advances available to all who need them.

alt

Read more:

Model Suggests There Are Fewer People with HIV in U.S. and More on Treatment

A study comparing recorded diagnoses of HIV with subsequent records of viral load and CD4 T-cell tests suggests that the number of people living with HIV in the U.S. could have been overestimated by as much as 45% -- and the proportion who are on antiretroviral therapy (ART) with undetectable viral loads could have been underestimated by as much as 50%. There could be as few as 820,000 people with HIV in the U.S. compared with the normally accepted figure of 1.2 million -- and up to 55% of those could be on ART and virally suppressed, compared with the most commonly quoted figure of 30%.

alt

Read more:

FDA Approves Descovy TAF Combination Pill for HIV Treatment, Not Yet for PrEP

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) this week approved Gilead Sciences' Descovy, a new combination pill containing tenofovir alafenamide (TAF), which is easier on the kidneys and bones than the older tenfovir disiproxil fumarate (TDF) version. The new coformulation is similar to Truvada, but it has been approved only for use as a component of HIV treatment, not for pre-exposure prophylaxis or PrEP.

alt

Read more:

Genvoya TAF Regimen Works Well with Improved Bone and Kidney Safety at 96 Weeks

The Genvoya single-tablet regimen containing tenofovir alafenamide (TAF) suppressed HIV as well as a similar coformulation containing the older tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF), but demonstrated better bone and kidney tolerability after 2 years of treatment, according to a report in the May 1 edition of the Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes.

alt

Read more:

CROI 2016: Long-Acting MK-8591 Could Be Future Option for HIV Treatment and Prevention

Merck's MK-8591, n investigational antiretroviral agent that maintains drug levels that are able to inhibit HIV up to 6 months after dosing could represent a "paradigm shift" in HIV therapy and prophylaxis, according to research presented at the recent Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2016) in Boston.

alt

Read more:

Gene Therapy Snips HIV Out of Infected Cells and Makes Uninfected Cells Resistant

For the first time, researchers have used a gene-editing technique related to one already used to produce cells resistant to HIV infection to target HIV-infected cells. They have managed to remove HIV genes completely from infected cells, as shown by reductions in the cells' overall rate of HIV production. In cells not already infected, the therapy has itself become part of their genome, producing cells that are resistant to infection for a prolonged period, according to a report in a recent edition of Nature Scientific Reports.

alt

Read more:

CROI 2016: VRC01 Antibody Delays But Does Not Prevent HIV Rebound After ART Interruption

VRC01, a broadly neutralizing antibody targeting HIV's CD4 binding site, was able to modestly delay the return of viral replication following interruption of antiviral therapy (ART), according to a study presented at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2016)last month in Boston. VRC01 did not maintain viral suppression on its own, but it may play a role in combination therapy for HIV treatment or a functional cure.

alt

Read more: