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CROI 2017: Long-Term Darunavir/Ritonavir Modestly Increases Risk of Cardiovascular Disease

Long-term use of the boosted protease inhibitor darunavir (Prezista) modestly increases the risk of cardiovascular disease, according to data from the ongoing D:A:D study presented to the recent Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections. Investigators identified an independent association between cumulative use of the drug over 5 years and heart attack and stroke.

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CROI 2017: Dolutegravir Monotherapy Fails to Maintain Viral Suppression

Dolutegravir used alone without other antiretrovirals was unable to keep viral load suppressed in some people who switched from a standard 3-drug combination regimen, according to research presented at the 2017 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) last month in Seattle. But evidence continues to show that dolutegravir plus a single other drug can work well as maintenance therapy.

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CROI 2017: Bacterial Vaginosis Does Not Affect Efficacy of Oral PrEP in Women

Research presented at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections last month in Seattle found that the efficacy of oral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for women was not affected by bacterial vaginosis (BV) -- the overgrowth in the vagina of untypical microbes. The effectiveness of PrEP in the Partners PrEP study was not significantly different in women with and without BV. This rules out BV as a possible cause for the lower effectiveness of oral PrEP in some studies of women compared to studies of men who have sex with men.

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CROI 2017: Integrase Inhibitors May Increase Risk of IRIS in Late Presenters for HIV Treatment

HIV integrase inhibitors such as dolutegravir and raltegravir may increase the risk of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome or IRIS, according to studies from the Netherlands and France presented last month at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections in Seattle.

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CROI 2017: Studies Look at Brain and Cognitive Changes in People with HIV As They Age

People with HIV often show persistent signs of cognitive impairment and abnormalities in brain structure despite suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART), but they do not appear to experience accelerated decline compared to HIV-negative people as they age, according to research presented at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections last month in Seattle.

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CROI 2017: HIV's Milder Cousin May Be Less Mild than Previously Thought

The virulence of HIV-2 virulence may have been underestimated, and although progression to AIDS and death in people with HIV-2 infection was slower than with HIV-1, it was the rule rather than the exception -- 70% progressed to AIDS within 20 years -- according to new research from West Africa presented at last month's Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections.

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CROI 2017: Point-of-Care Testing Improves Infant HIV Diagnosis Rate, Treatment, and Retention

Using a point-of-care test to diagnose HIV in infants significantly improved retention in care, speeded up antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation, and increased the proportion of infants who started treatment, a large randomized study in Mozambique has found. The results were presented at the 2017 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections last month in Seattle.

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