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Truvada PrEP Appears to Work for Transgender Women, But Only If Used Consistently

The more than 300 transgender women in the pivotal iPrEx pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) trial had similar overall HIV infection rates whether they were randomized to take Truvada or placebo, but those with drug levels indicating consistent PrEP use appeared to be protected, researchers reported in the November 5 advance online edition of The Lancet.

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FDA Approves Gilead's Genvoya Single-tablet Regimen with Tenofovir Alafenamide

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced on November 5 the approval of Gilead Sciences' Genvoya, a new once-daily single-tablet regimen containing the integrase inhibitor elvitegravir, the booster cobicistat, emtricitabine, and tenofovir alafenamide (TAF) -- a new formulation that is easier on the kidneys and bones than the older tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF).

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EACS 2015: London Clinic Survey Shows Impact of Chemsex on Condom and PEP Use

A survey of gay men in London using drugs during sex -- known as "chemsex" --has shown high levels of unprotected sex and hepatitis C among both HIV-positive and HIV-negative men, high levels of post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) use, and a high frequency of injection drug use, according to research presented at the 15th European AIDS Conference last month in Barcelona.

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EACS 2015: Does Low-level HIV Viral Load Raise the Risk of Disease Progression and Comorbidities?

HIV-positive people with detectable but low viral load -- in the range of 50 to 500 or 1000 copies/mL -- may continue to have a higher risk of AIDS-related events, but their likelihood of experiencing serious non-AIDS events including heart, liver, and kidney disease did not appear to increase, according to a pair of Italian studies presented at the 15th European AIDS Conference last month in Barcelona.

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EACS 2015: Majority of Migrants with HIV in Europe May Have Acquired Virus in New Country

A study presented at the 15th European AIDS Conference last month in Barcelona found evidence that the majority of migrants living with HIV in Europe, and who were diagnosed less than 5 years ago, probably acquired the virus in their host country rather than the one in which they were born. The aMASE (Advancing Migrant Access to Health Services in Europe) study found that the proportion of people with a documented or probable date of HIV infection later than their move to, or within, Europe was higher than those with a documented or probable pre-migration infection date, and that this applied to all risk groups, all areas of origin, and both sexes.

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Long-acting Injectable Cabotegravir + Rilpivirine Maintains HIV Suppression for 32 Weeks

A combination of 2 long-acting injectable antiretrovirals -- ViiV Healthcare's experimental integrase inhibitor cabotegravir and Janssen's NNRTI rilpivirine -- given once every 4 or 8 weeks maintained viral suppression as well as a standard oral regimen and appears safe and well-tolerated, the companies announced this week. These findings from the Phase 2b LATTE 2 trial follow earlier reports from the original LATTE study showing that oral cabotegravir plus rilpivirine suppressed HIV as well as an efavirenz-based regimen, but with fewer side effects.

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European Medicines Agency Drops Class-wide Nucleoside/Nucleotide Drug Warning

The European Medicines Agency recently updated its advice about lipodystrophy and lactic acidosis for people being treated for HIV, and called for modification of the warning required on all nucleoside/nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), as these toxicities are now known to be associated with specific drugs that are no longer widely used in high-income countries. U.S. advocates have asked the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to make a similar change.

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