Back HIV/AIDS

HIV / AIDS

Black People with HIV Have Less Linkage to Care, Higher Rate of Death

Coinciding with National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day last week, a pair of reports in the February 6 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report look at health disparities among African-Americans living with HIV. One study found that while the mortality rate among black people with HIV is falling, it is still 13% higher that that of whites. The second found that only about half of black people diagnosed with HIV were not linked to care. 

alt

Atazanavir Associated with Less HIV Treatment Failure, Illness, and Death

People with HIV who used antiretroviral regimens containing the ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitor atazanavir (Reyataz) had better outcomes than those taking lopinavir/ritonavir (Kaletra), including lower likelihood of AIDS-defining illnesses or death, less virological failure, and larger CD4 T-cell increases, according to a study published in the January 6 edition of Clinical Infectious Diseases.

alt

Obama Budget Boosts U.S. HIV and Hepatitis Funding, Cuts Global AIDS and TB

President Obama's proposed $4 trillion budget for fiscal year 2016 would increase funding for CDC's viral hepatitis and HIV prevention efforts, boost spending for HIV research, and allocate more to combat antibiotic resistance. The proposal would also change the law to allow Medicare to negotiate prescription drug prices, which could potentially save billions of dollars. But the plan would cut overall global health funding, including support for the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Malaria, and Tuberculosis. 

alt

Saturday is National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day

Saturday, February 7, is National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day (NBHAAD), an opportunity to raise awareness about the disproportionate burden of HIV/AIDS among African Americans. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), African Americans represent approximately 12% of the U.S. population, but accounted for 44% of new HIV infections and 43% of all people living with HIV in 2010.

alt

HIV Rebound Linked to Liver Fibrosis Progression in HIV/HCV Coinfected

HIV-positive people with hepatitis C virus (HCV) experienced progression to liver fibrosis if their HIV viral load rebounded above 1000 copies/mL or remained detectable on 2 consecutive tests, researchers reported in the January edition of HIV Medicine. Smaller transient HIV "blips," however, were not associated with worsening fibrosis. Optimized antiretroviral therapy, the study authors suggested, may protect the liver.

alt

HIV May Cause Cognitive Impairment by Disrupting Brain's Garbage Disposal

HIV's Tat protein interferes with autophagy, a process by which damaged or unneeded cell components are broken down and eliminated, according to research published in the February 4 Journal of Neuroscience. This disruption can lead to neuron damage, but the immunosuppressant drug rapamycin was able to reverse this process in a study of mice.

alt

FDA Approves 2 New Boosted Protease Inhibitor Coformulations for HIV

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) this week approved 2 new fixed-dose coformulations of HIV protease inhibitors with a cobicistat booster. Bristol-Myers Squibb's Evotaz contains atazanavir (sold separately as Reyataz) plus cobicistat, while Janssen Therapeutics' Prezcobix contains darunavir (sold separately as Prezista) plus cobicistat.

alt