Back HIV Prevention

CROI 2017: Changes In Viral Suppression Over Time Reveal Disparities in HIV Care

Sustained viral suppression over the course of a year may be a better measure than the most recent viral load test result when it comes to understanding access to and engagement in HIV care, according a study by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) researchers presented at the 2017 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections this week in Seattle.

alt

Read more:

CROI 2017: New HIV Infections Fall in the U.S. but Disparities Remain

The number of annual new HIV infections in the U.S. fell by 18% overall since 2008, offering evidence that prevention and treatment efforts are having an impact, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released to coincidence with presentations at the 2017 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections this week in Seattle. A closer look at the data, however, shows some notable differences across demographic groups and geographic regions.

alt

Read more:

Study Shows Supervised Injection Facility Would Be Cost-Effective in San Francisco

Establishing a supervised consumption facility for people who inject drugs in San Francisco could reduce new HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections, decrease overdose deaths, and save millions of dollars, according to a mathematical modeling study recently published online in the Journal of Drug Issues.

alt

Read more:

CROI 2017: STI Prophylaxis in PrEP Users Reduces Syphilis and Chlamydia, but Not Gonorrhea

Use of the antibiotic doxycycline as on-demand post-exposure prophylaxis by men who have sex with men taking part in the Ipergay HIV PrEP trial produced a 70% drop in chlamydia infections and a 73% drop in syphilis, but no reduction in gonorrhea, according to a late-breaking report at the 2017 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) this week in Seattle.

alt

Read more:

HIVandHepatitis.com 2016 Conference Coverage

Article listings by topic for HIVandHepatitis.com conference coverage in 2016, including the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections, EASL International Liver Congress, International AIDS Conference, and AASLD Liver Meeting.

alt

Read more:

CROI 2017: Infants Treated Within Days of Birth Can Clear HIV Reservoir Rapidly

HIV viral load and viral DNA fall rapidly in infants who begin antiretroviral therapy (ART) within days of birth, a pair of South African studies have found, showing the potential for clearing the reservoir of HIV-infected cells -- but infants with such a dramatic response to treatment may be a minority. The findings were presented at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2017) this week in Seattle.

alt

Read more:

Top 10 HIV and Hepatitis Stories of 2016

Simplification and optimization of antiretroviral therapy for HIV, wider use of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), a growing appreciation that people with undetectable viral load do not transmit HIV, and an expanded armamentarium of treatments for hepatitis C were among the top HIV and viral hepatitis headlines this year. Here's a look back at some of our biggest news from 2016.

alt

Read more:

CROI 2017: A Combination of Factors Has Reduced HIV Infections in Hard-Hit Part of Africa

HIV incidence has started to tumble in the Rakai cohort, one of the best-studied groups of people in Africa, according to a report at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections this week in Seattle. The annual HIV infection rate has fallen 40% in the last 4 years, researchers said. A combination of factors -- including wider availability of antiretroviral therapy, increased male circumcision, and later age of sexual debut in young people -- all appear to be contributing to this decline.

alt

Read more:

Dolutegravir + Rilpivirine HIV Maintenance Regimen Looks Good in Phase 3 Studies

Switching to a 2-drug regimen of dolutegravir plus rilpivirine maintained viral suppression among people on successful 3- or 4-drug antiretroviral therapy (ART) in a pair of Phase 3 clinical trials, according to an announcement last week from ViiV Healthcare.

alt

Read more:

CROI 2017: Treatment or Watchful Waiting for Cervical Abnormalities in Women with HIV?

Close monitoring of earlier-stage cervical abnormalities (CIN-2) may be preferable to treatment for many women with HIV, a U.S. study suggests. The findings, presented at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections this week in Seattle, show that CIN-2 regressed in over three-quarters of women taking antiretroviral therapy, without the need for CIN treatment. A higher CD4 count was associated with a lower likelihood that lesions would progress.

alt

Read more:

U.K.'s Largest Sexual Health Clinic Saw 40% Drop in New HIV Diagnoses in 2016

The clinic at 56 Dean Street in Soho, central London, the largest sexual health clinic in the U.K., saw an unprecedented 40% drop in new HIV diagnoses this year. Another clinic, the Mortimer Market Centre a mile away from Dean Street, has seen an even bigger 50% fall.

alt

Read more:

CROI 2017: Integrase Inhibitor Bictegravir Matches Dolutegravir for First-Line HIV Treatment

Bictegravir, an investigational integrase inhibitor from Gilead Sciences, was highly potent, well tolerated and worked as well as dolutegravir (Tivcay) in a Phase 2 clinical trial, according to study results presented at the 2017 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) this week in Seattle and published online in The Lancet HIV.

alt

Read more:

First Large Study of Long-Acting Injectable for HIV Prevention Now Underway

The National Institutes of Health and industry collaborators last week launched a large-scale clinical trial to test long-acting injectable cabotegravir for HIV prevention. Study HPTN 083 will compare cabotegravir injections administered every 8 weeks versus once-daily oral tenofovir/emtricitabine (Truvada) pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). Results are expected in 2021.

alt

Read more:

CROI 2017: Dual Antiretroviral Regimen Maintains Durable HIV Suppression after Switch

People who switched from standard antiretroviral therapy to a 2-drug regimen of dolutegravir (Tivicay) plus rilpivirine (Edurant) were able to maintain an undetectable viral load for 48 weeks in a pair of late-stage clinical trials, according to a late-breaking report at the 2017 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) this week in Seattle.

alt

Read more:

1. HIV Undetectable = Uninfectious

Evidence continues to accumulate showing that HIV-positive people on effective combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) with a consistently undetectable viral load have a very low -- perhaps as low as zero -- risk of transmitting the virus.

alt

Read more:

Golden Compass Program Launches at San Francisco General Hospital

The Golden Compass program is now open at Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital's Ward 86, offering one-stop shopping for HIV-positive people age 50 and older. The program, which started seeing patients this past fall, held its official launch party on February 3.

alt

Read more:

2. Quicker, Simpler, and Better Antiretroviral Therapy

Modern antiretroviral therapy (ART) is highly effective and well-tolerated, but researchers continue to refine, streamline, and optimize treatment strategies. Studies presented this year show the benefits of starting ART as soon as possible after HIV diagnosis and suggest that fewer drugs taken less often may be effective for many people.

alt

Read more:

Hope Overshadowed -- The National HIV PrEP Summit

The U.S. National HIV PrEP Summit, which took place in early December in San Francisco, was designed as an event of celebration and hope. Its structure, its speakers, even the way the plenary room was designed and the way the speakers dressed, all conveyed one message: we are all in this together, and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) really is the game-changer we have been looking for.

alt

Read more:

3. Renewed Focus on HIV Vaccines and Antibodies

Researchers intensified the search for novel types of therapies to prevent, treat, and potentially cure HIV, including immune-based strategies such as antibodies and vaccines.

alt

Read more:

No New HIV Infections in Northern California Kaiser PrEP Program, but STI Rates Rising

No new HIV infections have been seen among nearly 1000 people who started Truvada for pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) at Kaiser Permanente Northern California, according to a report in the December 15, 2016, Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes. The most recent analysis shows, however, that incidence of chlamydia and gonorrhea is high, suggesting that sexually transmitted infection (STI) testing may be needed quarterly rather than every 6 months.

alt

Read more:

4. PrEP Use Widens, But Disparities Remain

Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) was again a major HIV story in 2016. The latest figures from a pharmacy survey by Gilead Sciences showed that more than 79,000 people in the U.S. have started Truvada (tenofovir/emtricitabine) for HIV prevention, but the survey does not include all PrEP providers and most experts think this estimate is low.

alt

Read more: