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HIV Glasgow: HIV Treatment Benefits Outweigh Clinical Impact of Lipodystrophy

Over a 20-year period, people who suffered lipodystrophy (abnormal fat distribution) and especially lipoatrophy (fat loss) when they started antiretroviral therapy (ART) actually had better health outcomes than people who did not suffer from it, according to a report at the 2016 International Congress on Drug Therapy in HIV Infection (HIV Glasgow) last week.

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HIV Glasgow: Tests of Online PrEP Purchases Find No Fakes and Adequate Drug Levels

A sexual health clinic in central London that offered to test drug levels in users of tenofovir/emtricitabine pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) who had bought it online found adequate levels of both drugs in their blood, and no sample suggesting counterfeit drugs.

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IDWeek 2016: Electronic Health Records Can Help Select Candidates for HIV PrEP

A machine learning algorithm used to analyze electronic health records (EHRs) identified high-risk individuals who could potentially benefit from HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), according to a report presented this week at IDWeek 2016 in New Orleans. Out of 800,000 patients in a large EHR database, more that 8000 were found to be potential PrEP candidates.

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HIVR4P: New HIV Prevention Tools Will Need Marketing and Effective Health Services to Expand Reach

There is a naivety among many HIV prevention researchers and advocates about the steps needed to introduce and implement new HIV prevention technologies such as oral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), vaginal rings, and vaccines, according to speakers at the HIV Research for Prevention (HIVR4P 2016) conference in Chicago last month. Developing an effective prevention method is the easy part, they suggested -- ensuring that the product reaches end users who need them can be more challenging.

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IDWeek 2016: Only a Small Proportion of HIV+ Gay Men Receive Anal Cancer Screening

In the absence of national screening guidelines, only 11% of HIV-positive gay and bisexual men in the U.S. received anal Pap smears to detect anal cancer or precancerous cell changes during 2009-2012, with disparities between patient groups and variations across centers, according to a presentation at IDWeek, taking place this week in New Orleans.

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IDWeek 2016: Dolutegravir Regimen Works Better than Atazanavir in Clinical Trial for Women

A once-daily regimen containing the potent HIV integrase inhibitor dolutegravir worked better than an older atazanavir-containing regimen -- with higher rates of viral suppression both overall and across race subgroups -- in the ARIA trial, one of the few antiretroviral therapy studies to enroll only women, according to a presentation at IDWeek last week in New Orleans.

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HIV Glasgow: French Study Reveals Growing Complexity of Medical Needs as People with HIV Age

The complexity of the needs of people living with HIV will continue to increase as the population ages, and clinicians need to go beyond thinking about co-morbidities to consider multi-morbidities -- clusters of medical conditions that complicate one another -- when caring for these people, Edouard Battegay from the University Hospital Zurich told attendees at the International Congress on Drug Therapy in HIV Infection (HIV Glasgow) this week.

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IDWeek 2016: Do HIV-Positive Men with Undetectable Viral Load Need to Wear Condoms?

In the face of extensive research showing that HIV-positive people on antiretroviral therapy (ART) with stable undetectable viral load have an extremely low likelihood of transmitting the virus, a majority of participants at IDWeek 2016 in New Orleans thought they should still be advised to use condoms -- a proportion that actually increased after a debate that laid out the evidence.

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HIV Glasgow: Dolutegravir and Central Nervous System Side-Effects -- Abacavir, Older Age Increase the Risk

Insomnia, dizziness, headache, and other central nervous system (CNS) side effects are occurring more frequently with everyday use of dolutegravir than clinical trials had suggested, and are most likely to occur among women, people over age 60, and people starting abacavir at the same time, a German research group reported at the International Congress on Drug Therapy in HIV Infection (HIV Glasgow) this week.

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