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HIV PrEP Is Approved in Scotland

The Scottish Medicines Consortium (SMC) announced this week that it had accepted tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine (Truvada) for use within the Scottish National Health Service as pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) to prevent HIV infection.

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BHIVA 2017: Large Fall in London HIV Diagnoses Is Due to Combination Prevention, Not Just PrEP

The number of new HIV diagnoses among gay men attending 5 key London clinics fell substantially during 2015 and 2016, Valerie Delpech of Public Health England reported at the British HIV Association (BHIVA) conference last week in Liverpool.

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CROI 2017: Simple Risk Score Can Identify Gay Men Who May Have Acute HIV Infection

A set of 7 simple questions about symptoms and risk factors identified three-quarters of gay men in Amsterdam who have acute (very recent) HIV infection, according to a study presented at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections in Seattle last month. Using this risk score could identify gay men requiring HIV RNA testing, which can detect acute infections, in addition to HIV antibody testing.

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CROI 2017: Accelerated Linkage to HIV Care Improves Retention by a Third

Close to 60% of adults benefitting from point-of-care CD4 cell count testing at HIV testing sites, accelerated antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation, and SMS appointment reminders were retained in care after 1 year, compared to just 44% of those receiving the standard of care in Mozambique, according to findings from the Engage4Health study presented at the recent Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2017) in Seattle.

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CROI 2017: Better Depression Care Could Improve Outcomes for HIV Treatment Programs

Improved management of depression and other mental health problems has the potential to improve the outcomes of HIV treatment programs, Pamela Collins of the U.S. National Institute of Mental Health reported at the recent Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections in Seattle. Mental health treatment should be integrated into HIV services in resource-limited settings, she said.

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CROI 2017: Test and Treat Study Shows Second Phase Is Finding More People with HIV

After a second wave of intensive household testing, a large study of the "test and treat" strategy in Zambia is diagnosing more people with HIV, getting more people onto treatment, and reducing the time between diagnosis and starting treatment, findings from the PopART study presented at the recent Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2017) show.

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CROI 2017: Peer Navigators Improve Linkage to HIV Care and Retention in South African Study

Adults recently diagnosed with HIV who get help from peers to address personal barriers to care together with SMS check-in messages, appointment, and healthy living reminders had nearly twice the odds of being retained in care at 1 year of follow-up compared to those getting standard care at primary health clinics in South Africa according to findings presented at the recent Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections.

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CROI 2017: 1 in 5 HIV+ Men in U.K. Who Say They Are Heterosexual Caught HIV from Another Man

A genetic analysis of a large database of people with HIV in care in the U.K. shows that 18% of HIV-positive men who claim to be exclusively heterosexual in fact belong to clusters of linked infections that consist only of men. The data were presented by Manon Ragonnet-Cronin and colleagues from Edinburgh University at the recent Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections in Seattle.

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CROI 2017: Finding Men with HIV -- and Keeping Them in Treatment

Specialized services to attract men to HIV testing and treatment may need to adopt several different formats in order to reach different sub-populations of men, suggesting there is no single service innovation that will boost uptake among men in sub-Saharan Africa, according to research from South Africa presented at last month’s Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections.

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