Coinfection

DHHS Guidelines Recommend ART for All HIV+, New Info on Older Patients and HIV/HCV Coinfection

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) this week released an updated version of its Guidelines for the Use of Antiretroviral Agents in HIV-1-Infected Adults and Adolescents. The DHHS panel now recommends that antiretroviral therapy (ART) should be offered to everyone diagnosed with HIV. Other highlights include new sections on aging with HIV and drug costs, more information on antiretroviral treatment as prevention, and recommendations for use of new hepatitis C protease inhibitors in HIV/HCV coinfected people.alt

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IAPAC Releases Guidelines for Improving Entry into and Retention in Care

Earlier this month the International Association of Physicians in AIDS Care (IAPAC) released new guidelines for improving entry into and retention in care for people with HIV, as well as optimizing adherence to antiretroviral therapy. The recommendations were published in the March 5, 2012, advance online edition of Annals of Internal Medicine to coincide with the 19th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2012) in Seattle.alt

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CROI 2012: HIV/HCV Coinfection News from CROI 2012 [VIDEO]

Hepatitis C was a major topic at the 19th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2012) last week in Seattle. Liz Highleyman from HIVandHepatitis.com spoke with Douglas Dieterich and Kenneth Sherman about advances in the field, with a focus on HIV/HCV coinfected patients.

The attention this year was apt, since an estimated one-third of people with HIV are coinfected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). Dieterich and Mark Sulkowski presented the first data on sustained virological response (SVR) using the recently approved HCV protease inhibitors boceprevir (Victrelis) and telaprevir (Incivek) plus pegylated interferon/ribavirin in HIV/HCV coinfected patients.alt

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CROI 2012: HIV Positive People Need Ribavirin for Optimal Treatment of Acute Hepatitis C

HIV positive people acutely infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes 2 or 3 benefit from receiving weight-based ribavirin in addition to pegylated interferon, according to study findings presented at the 19th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2012) this month in Seattle.alt

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CROI 2012: Interactions between HCV Drug Daclatasvir and HIV Antiretrovirals Are Minimal or Manageable

The investigational hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS5A inhibitor daclatasvir (formerly BMS-790052) showed no clinically relevant effects on blood levels of 3 classes of antiretroviral agents, and changes in daclatasvir levels can likely be overcome by dose adjustment, according to a data presented at the 19th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2012) in Seattle.alt

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Coverage of the 2012 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections

HIVandHepatitis.com's complete coverage of the 19th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2012), March 5-8, 2012.

Featuring new HIV drugs, HIV cure research, biomedical prevention, HIV-related conditions and complications, basic science, hepatitis C, and HIV/HCV coinfection.

Full listing by topic

HIVandHepatitis.com CROI 2012 section

3/16/12

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CROI 2012: Telaprevir and Boceprevir Improve Sustained Response Rates in HIV/HCV Coinfected Patients

Adding a first-generation HCV protease inhibitor to pegylated interferon/ribavirin dramatically increases the likelihood of 12-week sustained virological response among HIV/HCV coinfected people, researchers reported Tuesday at the 19th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2012) in Seattle.alt

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CROI 2012: Studies Look at Interactions Between New Hepatitis C Drugs and HIV Antiretrovirals

Drug-drug interactions between direct-acting antiviral agents for hepatitis C and some altantiretroviral medications used to treat HIV are common, but are often modest and can be managed with dose adjustments when treating people with HIV/HCV coinfection, researchers reported at the 19th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2012) last week in Seattle.

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Study Shows How Interferon Fights HIV Along with HCV In Coinfected Patients

Interferon, a drug commonly used to treat chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, is also active against HIV, and new research sheds further light on how it works, according to researcher published in the February 21, 2012, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, and described in a recent news article from the University of California at San Francisco (UCSF).alt

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