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CROI 2015: Smoking Outweighs HIV-Related Risk Factors for Non-AIDS Cancers

Smoking appears to contribute most to the burden of non-AIDS-defining cancers diagnosed in people living with HIV in the U.S., out of all the potential modifiable risk factors -- including hepatitis B or C, low CD4 cell count, an AIDS diagnosis, or having an unsuppressed viral load -- according to a study reported last week at the 2015 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) in Seattle.

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CROI 2015: Screening Finds High Prevalence of Early-Stage Lung Cancer in Smokers with HIV

Using low-dose computed tomography to screen selected people living with HIV who smoke led to early lung cancer diagnoses at younger ages than normally seen in the general population, according to findings from the ANRS EP48 HIV CHEST study reported last week at the 2015 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) in Seattle.

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Coverage of the 2015 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections

HIVandHepatitis.com coverage of the 2015 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic infections (CROI 2015), February 23-26, 2015, in Seattle.

Conference highlights include PrEP and HIV treatment as prevention, hepatitis C treatment for HIV/HCV coinfected people, new antiretroviral drugs, HIV cure research, HIV-related conditions, TB, Ebola virus, and access to care.

HIVandHepatitis.com coverage by topic

CROI website

3/2/15

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CROI 2015: Varenicline Helps People with HIV Stop Smoking, but Success Rate Remains Low

The smoking cessation drug varenicline (Chantix) helped more people with HIV to stop smoking than counseling alone, but less than 20% were able to remain abstinent for a year, according to the results of a French study presented at the 2015 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) last week in Seattle.The smoking cessation rates in this study were comparable to those previously seen for HIV-negative people using varenicline or other methods -- across the board only a minority manage to quit long-term.

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CROI 2015: Retrovirus Conference Now Underway in Seattle

The 2015 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) takes place this week, February 23-26, at the Washington State Convention Center in Seattle. CROI focuses on HIV treatment, prevention, and basic science. For the past several years it has also included substantial hepatitis C content, and this year will feature presentations on Ebola virus. HIVandHepatitis.com is on site in Seattle all week bringing you news coverage and Twitter updates (@HIVandHepatitis).

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CROI 2015: Smoking and Its Detrimental Outcomes for People with HIV

Smoking and its consequences was a major topic at the 2015 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections(CROI) last week in Seattle. Researchers presented findings on smoking as a risk factor for cancer, CT scans to detect early lung cancer, and varenicline for smoking cessation.

Smoking Outweighs HIV-Related Risk Factors for Non-AIDS Cancers

Screening Finds High Prevalence of Early-Stage Lung Cancer in Smokers with HIV

Varenicline Helps People with HIV Stop Smoking

3/4/15

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CROI 2015: Retrovirus Conference Starts Monday in Seattle

The 2015 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) takes place next week, February 23-26, at the Washington State Convention Center in Seattle. CROI focuses on HIV treatment, prevention, and basic science. For the past several years it has also included substantial hepatitis C content, and this year will feature presentations on Ebola virus. HIVandHepatitis.com will be on site in Seattle all week bringing you news coverage and Twitter updates (@HIVandHepatitis).

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CROI 2015: Study Finds High Rates of Cancer Among Elderly People with HIV

Elderly people living with HIV (over the age of 65) are at greatly increased risk of HIV-associated cancers, though many of the most commonly diagnosed cancers may be related more to aging than to HIV itself, according to a study reported last week at the at the 2015 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI).

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Screening for Bone Fracture Risk Should Be Routine for HIV+ People over 40

Screening for fracture risk should be a routine part of HIV care for all people over 40, and all postmenopausal women, all men over 50, and people at high risk for fractures of any age should undergo DEXA screening (a type of X-ray) to assess bone mineral density and their need for treatment, experts on bone disorders recommend in new guidelines published in the January 21 online edition of Clinical Infectious Diseases.

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