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Coverage of the 2016 International AIDS Conference

HIVandHepatitis.com coverage of the 21st International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2014), July 18-22, in Durban, South Africa.

Conference highlights include PrEP and other biomedical HIV prevention, HIV cure research, experimental antiretroviral therapy, and access to treatment and prevention for key affected populations.

Full listing by topic

AIDS 2016 website

7/28/16

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AIDS 2016: START Analysis Looks at Who Benefits Most from Immediate HIV Treatment

Starting antiretroviral therapy (ART) soon after HIV diagnosis led to better outcomes than delayed treatment in all population subgroups in the START trial, researchers reported at the 21st International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2016) last week in Durban. But some people saw greater risk reductions, including those over age 50, those with a lower CD4:CD8 ratio and higher viral load, and those with cardiovascular risk factors.

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AIDS 2016: HIV Stigma Persists in the Undetectable Era

In an era of widespread HIV treatment and undetectable viral load, stigma remains a persistent feature in the lives of almost half of people living with diagnosed HIV in the U.K., according to findings from The People Living with HIV Stigma Survey UK 2015, reported at the 21st International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2016) last week in Durban. Nonetheless the majority of people with HIV score highly on measures of psychological resilience, enabling them to cope better with stigma.

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AIDS 2016: Starting Treatment on the Day of HIV Diagnosis Improves Outcomes

Interventions to improve linkage to HIV care and retention in treatment which speed up the start of antiretroviral therapy (ART) or provide intensive support to people before starting treatment produce better retention than standard practices, researchers reported at the 21st International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2016) last week in Durban.

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AIDS 2016: Once-Daily Raltegravir Works as Well as Twice-Daily For Initial HIV Treatment

A new formulation of the integrase inhibitor raltegravir (Isentress) taken once daily suppressed HIV viral load as well as the older formulation taken twice a day in people being treated for the first time, according to findings from the ONCEMRK study presented in a late-breaker session at the 21st International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2016) last week in Durban.

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AIDS 2016: PrEP Rollout in France Tops 1000, Ipergay Shows 97% Effectiveness

Through July 2016, a total of 1077 people -- 96.4% of them gay men -- have started HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) through the public healthcare system in France, Jean-Michel Molina, principal investigator of the Ipergay trial, told delegates at the 21st International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2016) last week in Durban. 90 clinics now offer PrEP assessment and prescription, and 273 doctors have been accredited as PrEP physicians.

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AIDS 2016: Bone Loss Recovers After Stopping PrEP, Biannual Kidney Monitoring Enough for Most

Young adults taking Truvada for pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) experienced a modest decrease in bone mineral density early on, but this stabilized after a year and those who stopped taking it began to see a reversal of the decline, researchers reported last week at the 21st International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2016) in Durban. Another study found that clinically relevant declines in kidney function among Truvada PrEP users are rare and monitoring every 6 months is adequate for most people.

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AIDS 2016: Early HIV Treatment -- Mothers Say They Need Time to Think

Findings from the first randomized controlled trial to date evaluating postpartum antiretroviral therapy (ART) for women with high CD4 cell counts (over 400 cells/mm3) highlight a critical need to increase treatment acceptance in this population, according to research presented at the 21st International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2016) last week in Durban.

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AIDS 2016: Study Looks at Comprehensive HIV Treatment and Prevention Services for Sex Workers

A randomized trial of female sex workers in Zimbabwe, offering enhanced access to HIV treatment and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), has failed to show that the extra services helped reduce the proportion with detectable viral load, Frances Cowan reported at the 21st International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2016) last week in Durban. However, it appears that the comprehensive set of sex worker-friendly services offered in the control arm may have already been enough to substantially improve the health of participants.

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