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Coverage of the 2016 International AIDS Conference

HIVandHepatitis.com coverage of the 21st International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2014), July 18-22, in Durban, South Africa.

Conference highlights include PrEP and other biomedical HIV prevention, HIV cure research, experimental antiretroviral therapy, and access to treatment and prevention for key affected populations.

Full listing by topic

AIDS 2016 website

7/28/16

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AIDS 2016: START Analysis Looks at Who Benefits Most from Immediate HIV Treatment

Starting antiretroviral therapy (ART) soon after HIV diagnosis led to better outcomes than delayed treatment in all population subgroups in the START trial, researchers reported at the 21st International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2016) last week in Durban. But some people saw greater risk reductions, including those over age 50, those with a lower CD4:CD8 ratio and higher viral load, and those with cardiovascular risk factors.

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AIDS 2016: Once-Daily Raltegravir Works as Well as Twice-Daily For Initial HIV Treatment

A new formulation of the integrase inhibitor raltegravir (Isentress) taken once daily suppressed HIV viral load as well as the older formulation taken twice a day in people being treated for the first time, according to findings from the ONCEMRK study presented in a late-breaker session at the 21st International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2016) last week in Durban.

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AIDS 2016: Starting Treatment on the Day of HIV Diagnosis Improves Outcomes

Interventions to improve linkage to HIV care and retention in treatment which speed up the start of antiretroviral therapy (ART) or provide intensive support to people before starting treatment produce better retention than standard practices, researchers reported at the 21st International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2016) last week in Durban.

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AIDS 2016: Dolutegravir Plus Lamivudine Works Well as First-Line HIV Treatment

A 2-drug regimen of dolutegravir and the well-tolerated NRTI lamivudine led to sustained viral suppression for most people starting antiretroviral therapy (ART) for the first time in a small pilot study, according to a late-breaker presentation at the 21st International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2016) last week in Durban.

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AIDS 2016: Early HIV Treatment -- Mothers Say They Need Time to Think

Findings from the first randomized controlled trial to date evaluating postpartum antiretroviral therapy (ART) for women with high CD4 cell counts (over 400 cells/mm3) highlight a critical need to increase treatment acceptance in this population, according to research presented at the 21st International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2016) last week in Durban.

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AIDS 2016: Long-Acting Injectable Drugs Work Well for HIV Maintenance Therapy

A pair of long-acting injectable antiretrovirals -- cabotegravir and rilpivirine -- administered once every 4 or 8 weeks maintained viral suppression in people who switched regimens with undetectable viral load, according to 48-week results from the LATTE-2 trial presented at the 21st International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2016) this week in Durban. A related qualitative analysis showed that study participants preferred long-acting injectables over pills for several reasons.

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