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IDWeek 2014: NNRTIs and Protease Inhibitors Both Good for First ART, Channeling Affects Choices

Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) and boosted protease inhibitors work equally well for people starting HIV treatment for the first time, with similar viral suppression, CD4 cell gains, and disease progression, according to a large meta-analysis presented at IDWeek 2014 last week in Philadelphia. A related study shed light on factors affecting choice of initial antiretroviral regimen.

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IDWeek 2014: Longer Use, Age, Low Body Weight Raise Risk of Tenofovir Kidney Problems

Abnormal kidney biomarkers are common but rarely progress to serious kidney dysfunction in HIV positive people taking tenofovir, and longer duration of use, older age, and having diabetes or high blood pressure raise the risk, researchers reported at IDWeek 2014 last week in Philadelphia. A related study found that people with low body weight experienced progressive kidney function decline while taking tenofovir.

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IDWeek 2014: Efavirenz Not Linked to Suicide in Analysis of Insurance Records

The non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor efavirenz (Sustiva, also in the Atripla single-tablet regimen) was not associated with a higher rate of suicidal thoughts or attempts in an analysis conducted by manufacturer Bristol-Myers Squibb (BMS), researchers reported at the 2014 IDWeek meeting last week in Philadelphia.

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HIV Positive Stimulant Users Benefit from Antiretroviral Therapy

People with HIV who use methamphetamine or other stimulant drugs do well on antiretroviral therapy (ART) and appear not to be at greater risk than non-users for AIDS-related or all-cause death overall, but those who use stimulants more than half the time did have a higher risk of progression to AIDS or death, according to a study published in the September 30 Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes.

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IDWeek 2014: Complera Matches Atripla for Women Starting HIV Treatment

The Complera (rilpivirine/tenofovir/emtricitabine) single-tablet regimen worked as well as Atripla (efavirenz/tenofovir/emtricitabine) for treatment-naive women and was somewhat better tolerated in the open-label STaR trial, according to a report at the IDWeek 2014 meeting last week in Philadelphia.

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Coverage of IDWeek 2014

HIVandHepatitis.com coverage of IDWeek 2014, October 8-12, in Philadelphia.

Conference highlights include the HIV cascade of care, experimental antiretroviral therapies, interferon-free hepatitis C treatment, and news about other infectious diseases including Ebola virus and enterovirus D68.

Full listing of coverage by topic

IDWeek 2014 website

10/17/14

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IDWeek 2014: Behavioral and Financial Incentives May Improve HIV Treatment Outcomes

While making medications free can remove barriers to access for individuals who cannot pay for treatment, data suggest that for most people accessing care in industrialized countries, "making medications available for free or low cost will not solve problems with medication non-adherence," according to a presentation by Kevin Volpp from the University of Pennsylvania last week at IDWeek 2014 in Philadelphia.

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