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Coinfection

EACS 2015: Successful Hepatitis C Treatment Lowers Risk of Death for HIV/HCV Coinfected People

Hepatitis C treatment that leads to sustained virological response (SVR) -- generally regarded as a cure -- was associated with a reduced risk of liver-related death and improved overall survival in an analysis of 3500 HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfected patients, according to a presentation at the 15th European AIDS Conference last week in Barcelona. A related study found that while some liver-related events are declining over time, liver cancer remains a risk for coinfected people.

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IDWeek 2015: Sofosbuvir + Daclatasvir Demonstrates High Cure Rates for HIV/HCV Coinfected People

Nearly all people with HIV and genotype 1-4 HCV coinfection treated for 12 weeks with an interferon-free regimen of sofosbuvir (Sovaldi) plus daclatasvir (Daklinza) achieved sustained virological response in the ALLY-2 trial, but 8 weeks did not work as well, according to a report in the August 20 New England Journal of Medicine. Substudies presented this month at IDWeek 2015 showed that this regimen is highly effective regardless of race or specific antiretroviral regimen.

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Tenofovir-containing Regimen Works Better Over Time for HIV/HBV Coinfected People

HIV-positive people coinfected with hepatitis B virus (HBV) who were treated with 2 dually-active drugs -- one of them being tenofovir -- responded about as well as people taking only lamivudine or emtricitabine at 24 weeks, but over the longer term those on tenofovir plus either lamivudine or emtricitabine were more likely to maintain undetectable HBV viral load, according to a study published in a recent edition of AIDS.

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Antiretroviral Treatment for HIV Appears to Protect Gay Men Against Hepatitis B

HIV-positive gay and bisexual men who use effective combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) were 80% less likely to become infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV) in a large observational study reported in the October 13 Annals of Internal Medicine. The authors emphasize, however, that ART is not a substitute for hepatitis B vaccination.

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IAS 2015: Fatty Liver May Contribute to Higher Risk of Death for HIV/HCV Coinfected People

About a quarter of HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfected people in a New York City cohort died over a 10-year follow-up period -- a "strikingly low" survival rate -- according to a poster presented at the 8th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment, and Prevention last month in Vancouver. Researchers saw trends toward an association between steatosis (fatty liver) and cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and overall survival.

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Abacavir/Lamivudine Could Be Driving Liver Damage in People with HIV/HCV Coinfection

Progression of liver fibrosis among ART-treated patients with HIV/HCV coinfection is associated with the type of nucleoside/nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) "backbone," Canadian research published in the September 23 online edition of Clinical Infectious Diseases suggests.

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IAS 2015: Accessing Hepatitis C Treatment [VIDEO]

While new interferon-free direct-acting antiviral therapy can cure more than 90% of people with chronic hepatitis C -- including those with HIV/HCV coinfection -- access to treatment remains a major challenge, experts said at a media briefing on HIV and hepatitis coinfection at the 8th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment, and Prevention last month in Vancouver.

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ICAAC 2015: Comorbidities and Mortality Among HIV-Positive and HIV/HCV Coinfected People

While illness and death due to opportunistic illnesses has declined, people living with HIV remain prone to comorbidities that contribute to hospitalization and reduced survival, according to presentations at the 55th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (ICAAC) last weekin San Diego. Mortality is higher among HIV-positive people coinfected with hepatitis C virus (HCV), and is associated with liver fibrosis progression, offering further evidence supporting prompt hepatitis C treatment.

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IAS 2015: HIV and Hepatitis B Coinfected People Can Safely Switch to Simpler TAF Single-Tablet Regimen

HIV-positive people with hepatitis B virus (HBV) coinfection maintained HIV viral suppression, maintained or achieved HBV suppression, and showed improvements in kidney and bone markers when they switched to a single-tablet regimen containing the integrase inhibitor elvitegravir and a new safer formulation of tenofovir, according to a late-breaking poster presented at the 8th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment, and Prevention last month in Vancouver.

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