Back Other Health News

Other Infections

CDC Releases Updated Sexually Transmitted Disease Treatment Guidelines

In June the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) published updates guidelines for the treatment of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). The guidelines include information on more than 2 dozen different sexually transmitted infections, as well as STD complications such as pelvic inflammatory disease and cervical and anal cancer.

alt

Read more:

Single Dose of Human Papillomavirus Vaccine May Prevent Most Cervical Cancer

Just 1 dose of the Cervarix human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine was able to protect 85% of young women against cancer-causing HPV types 16 and 18, suggesting that it could prevent a majority of cervical cancer cases, including in settings were administration of the full 3-dose series is difficult, according to an analysis of data from 2 large trials published in the June 9 edition of Lancet Oncology.

alt

Read more:

April Is Sexually Transmitted Disease Awareness Month

April is STD Awareness Month in the U.S., an opportunity to promote education and raise awareness about sexually transmitted infections and to encourage people to get tested. Half of the estimated 20 million STDs that occur in the U.S. each year are among young people, and this year's STD Awareness Month effort focuses on this population.

alt

Read more:

EASL 2015: Milk Thistle May Improve Steatohepatitis, Capsaicin from Chili Peppers Helps Fibrosis

People who used silymarin, derived from the milk thistle plant, experienced a resolution of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and a reduction in liver fibrosis in a randomized, placebo-controlled trial, researchers reported at the European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) 50th International Liver Congress last month in Vienna. Another study found that dietary capsaicin, derived from chili peppers, was associated with improvement in mice with artificially induced fibrosis, the precursor to cirrhosis.

alt

Read more:

March 24 Is World TB Day

March 24 is World TB Day, an opportunity to raise awareness about tuberculosis (TB) and the need for expanded testing and treatment worldwide. The latest data from the CDC indicate that TB cases in the U.S. have reached an all-time low of 9412 cases, but the decline has slowed. Globally, the World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that 9 million people fell ill with TB -- including 480,000 with multidrug-resistant TB -- and 1.5 million people died from the disease in 2013. An estimated 1.1 million people living with HIV were coinfected with TB in 2013, and TB is among the leading causes of death for HIV-positive people, accounting for 25% of all HIV-related deaths.

alt

Read more:

EASL 2015: Heavy Drinkers Contribute Most to Liver Cirrhosis Burden; Heavy Alcohol Use Rising in U.S.

The number of people who regularly consume more than a moderate amount of alcohol is a better indicator of alcoholic cirrhosis prevalence than per capita annual consumption, or the total amount consumed per year divided by the entire population, according to a presentation at the European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) 50th International Liver Congress last month in Vienna. A related study found that heavy drinking and binge drinking have risen over the past decade in the U.S., largely due to increases among women.

alt

Read more:

World TB Day: Find, Treat, and Cure Tuberculosis

In recognition of World TB Day on March 24, organizations released their latest figures on tuberculosis in the U.S. and worldwide and called for more action to improve access to testing, care, and treatment, while 2 recent studies offered promise for shorter therapy.

March 24 Is World TB Day

PaMZ Combination Regimen Shortens and Simplifies Tuberculosis Treatment

CROI 2015: High-Dose Rifampin Shortens Time to Tuberculosis Clearance

3/24/15

alt

 

 

 

Coffee Helps Protect Against Liver Cancer, Obesity Confirmed as Risk Factors

Drinking coffee regularly may help prevent development of liver cancer, according to a systemic research review of 34 studies with more than 8 million total participants conducted by the World Cancer Research Fund's Continuous Update Project (CUP). The analysis also found that being overweight and heavy alcohol consumption are major risk factors for liver cancer.

alt

Read more:

PaMZ Combination Regimen Shortens and Simplifies Tuberculosis Treatment

An oral regimen combining the new drug pretomanid (PA-824) with the older moxifloxacin and pyrazinamide -- known as PaMZ for short -- has the potential to reduce the duration of treatment for drug-sensitive and even some drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB), according to findings from a study published in the March 17 online edition The Lancet. Nearly twice as many patients treated with the PaMZ regimen had undetectable TB in cultured sputum compared to those taking standard therapy.

alt

Read more: