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Other Infections

AIDS 2016: High-Dose Rifampicin for TB May Improve Survival of HIV+ People with Low CD4 Counts

More aggressive tuberculosis (TB) treatment using a high dose of rifampicin, in addition to antiretroviral therapy (ART), could reduce mortality among people with HIV/TB coinfection who are severely immunocompromised, according to results from the 3-arm RAFA trial presented at the 21st International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2016) last month in Durban.

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AIDS 2016: Does Detectable CMV Signal High Mortality Risk for Older People with HIV and TB?

A study conducted in a cohort of hospitalized adults with HIV-associated tuberculosis (TB) in Khayelitsha found that having a detectable cytomegalovirus (CMV) viral load was associated with higher mortality within the first 12 weeks on TB treatment, according to Amy Ward from the University of Cape Town, who presented the findings at the 21st International AIDS Conference last month in Durban.

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Gardasil HPV Vaccine Reduces Occurrence of Genital Warts and Cervical Dysplasia

 

Countries that widely use a quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine have seen up to a 90% reduction in HPV infections and decreases in the incidence of genital warts and cervical cell abnormalities that can lead to cancer, according to an analysis of nearly 60 studies from 9 countries presented at the European Research Organization on Genital Infection and Neoplasia and published in the May 26 edition of Clinical Infectious Diseases.

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AIDS 2016: Training Community Health Workers Leads to Surge in TB Diagnoses in Malawi

An intervention using community health workers -- who normally provide case management support for HIV-positive pregnant women and their families -- to also provide intensified tuberculosis (TB) case finding was associated with a dramatic 20-fold increase in TB detection at a very busy antiretroviral therapy (ART) clinic in rural Malawi, according to a study presented at the 21st International AIDS Conference last week in Durban.

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ASM Microbe 2016: Novel Immune Therapy GEN-003 Improves Genital Herpes

GEN-003, a therapeutic vaccine containing recombinant herpes simplex virus (HSV) antigens, showed significant antiviral activity lasting up to a year and reduced the number of genital herpes lesions and days with recurrences, researchers reported this week at the ASM Microbe 2016 meeting in Boston.

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AIDS 2016: TB 2016 Demands a Global Commitment to End Tuberculosis

While much of the TB 2016 meeting, held ahead of the 21st International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2016) in Durban, was devoted to the rapidly evolving science in the fight against tuberculosis (TB), the meeting also highlighted the failure of the world, including the international HIV community, to adequately respond to the TB epidemic -- which last year surpassed HIV as the leading infectious cause of death in the world.

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FDA Approves First Long-Lasting Buprenorphine Implant for Opioid Maintenance Therapy

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration last month approved the first-ever buprenorphine implant -- to be marketed under the brand name Probuphine -- which provides a steady dose of the drug over 6 months for people who are receiving opioid substitution therapy to manage dependence or addiction.

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AIDS 2016: Shortened Regimen for MDR-TB Shows Good Results for Children

The use of a shortened 9-month treatment regimen for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB), known as the "Bangladesh regimen," was shown to be successful in 83% of children and adolescents diagnosed with rifampicin-resistant TB, researchers reported at the TB 2016 meeting, held ahead of the 21st International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2016) this week in Durban. A second study presented at the meeting showed that the antibiotic levofloxacin can be used to treat MDR-TB in children.

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ASCO 2016: PD-1 Blocker Nivolumab Shows Promise for Advanced Anal Cancer

The checkpoint inhibitor nivolumab(Opdivo), a monoclonal antibody targeting the PD-1 receptor, demonstrated activity against metastatic anal cancer that in patients who did not respond to prior treatment, according to research presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) annual meeting this week in Chicago. 70% of participants in this small study experienced complete or partial response or stabilized disease.

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