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52nd Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (ICAAC 2012)

September 9-12, 2012, San Francisco

ICAAC 2012: HIV May Be Shed in Semen Even If Blood Viral Load Is Undetectable

About 8% of HIV positive gay and bisexual men intermittently had detectable HIV viral load in their semen even when their blood viral load was fully suppressed, researchers reported at the 52nd Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (ICAAC 2012) this month in San Francisco. This is more than twice the rate seen in a similar study of heterosexual men. alt

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ICAAC 2012: Bone Loss Is Common in French HIV Cohort, Linked to Older Age and Lower Weight

As many as half of people with HIV may have some degree of bone loss -- and up to 20% may experience fractures -- but no other significant risk factors could be determined other than older age and low body mass index, researchers reported at the 52nd Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (ICAAC 2012) this month in San Francisco. alt

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ICAAC 2012: Novel NNRTI MK-1439 Shows Potent Activity, Distinct Resistance Profile

The novel non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) MK-1439 exhibited good activity against a variety of HIV subtypes and maintained its potency against most common NNRTI-resistant viruses, researchers reported at the 52nd Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (ICAAC 2012) this month in San Francisco. alt

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ICAAC 2012: Infections are Common among HIV/HCV Coinfected Patients on Interferon

Life-threatening infections occur frequently among people with HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfection during treatment with pegylated interferon plus ribavirin, but this does not appear to be a consequence of neutropenia, or loss of white blood cells, according to a poster presented at the 52nd Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (ICAAC 2012) this month on San Francisco. alt

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ICAAC 2012: Zinc Finger Gene Therapy Leads to Gains in CD4 T-Cells, Especially Memory Cells

Gene therapy using a zinc finger nuclease that makes CD4 T-cells resistant to HIV infection led to long-term gains in CD4 cell counts among HIV positive people with poor immunological recovery on antiretroviral therapy (ART), researchers reported at the 52nd Interscience Conference on Antimicrobials and Chemotherapy (ICAAC) last week in San Francisco. Transitional memory T-cells appeared to account for most of the increase. 

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