Back HIV/HBV Coinfection

HIV/HBV Coinfection

Coverage of the 2014 AASLD Liver Meeting

HIVandHepatitis.com coverage of the 65th Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD 2014) in Boston, November 7-11, 2014.

Conference highlights include new interferon-free therapy for hepatitis C -- including options for people with cirrhosis, and liver transplant recipients -- treatment for hepatitis B, and prevention and management of advanced liver disease.

Full listing by topic

The Liver Meeting website

12/2/14

alt

IDWeek 2014: HIV and Hepatitis B Coinfection Linked to Hip Fractures

People with HIV/HBV coinfection being treated for both diseases had a significantly higher risk of hip fractures than patients with HIV alone or neither virus, according to research presented at IDWeek 2014 last week in Philadelphia.

alt

Read more:

ASCO: HCV Reactivation, Brain Involvement Do Not Worsen Lymphoma Survival for People with HIV

Reactivation of hepatitis C was common among HIV positive people with lymphoma, but did not appear to lead to worse outcomes or decreased survival, according to a study presented at the 50th American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) meeting this week in Chicago. A related study found that having central nervous system involvement at the time of diagnosis did not decrease survival of people with AIDS-related lymphoma.

alt

Read more:

Tenofovir Usually Suppresses Hepatitis B in HIV/HBV Coinfected People

Tenofovir led to undetectable hepatitis B virus (HBV) levels in 87% of HIV positive coinfected individuals, and a similar proportion maintained viral suppression over 6 years, according to a study described in the June 20 advance edition of Hepatology.

alt

Read more:

CROI 2014 & EASL 2014: Treating Hepatitis B and C in HIV+ People Reduces Liver Disease

Effective antiviral treatment that suppresses hepatitis B virus (HBV) repliaction or eradicates hepatitis C virus (HCV) can lower the risk of developing advanced liver disease including cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, and decompensation in people with HIV and viral hepatitis coinfection, according to studies presented at the recent Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) and EASL International Liver Congress.

alt

Read more: