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HIV/HBV Coinfection

CROI 2016: HIV/HBV Coinfection Linked to Worse Immune Recovery and Death

HIV-positive people with hepatitis B virus (HBV) coinfection had impaired CD4 cell recovery after starting antiretroviral (ART) and a higher risk of death than those without hepatitis B, but use of ART regimens containing tenofovir significantly reduced mortality, according to a study presented at the recent Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2016)in Boston.

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Coverage of the 2016 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections

HIVandHepatitis.com coverage of the 2016 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic infections (CROI 2016), February 22-25, 2016, in Boston.

Conference highlights include PrEP and other HIV prevention innovations, new HIV treatment strategies, HIV cure research, the cascade of care, HIV-related conditions, and optimizing therapy for hepatitis C.

HIVandHepatitis.com coverage by topic

CROI website

2/26/16

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Antiretroviral Treatment for HIV Appears to Protect Gay Men Against Hepatitis B

HIV-positive gay and bisexual men who use effective combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) were 80% less likely to become infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV) in a large observational study reported in the October 13 Annals of Internal Medicine. The authors emphasize, however, that ART is not a substitute for hepatitis B vaccination.

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Coverage of the 2015 AASLD Liver Meeting

HIVandHepatitis.com coverage of the 2015 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD) Liver Meeting in San Francisco, November 13-17, 2015.

Conference highlights include interferon-free therapy for hepatitis C, treatment for difficult-to-treat populations including people with HCV genotype 3 and liver  cirrhosis, hepatitis B prevention and treatment, and management of advanced liver disease.

Full listing by topic

Liver Meeting website

11/23/15

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Tenofovir-containing Regimen Works Better Over Time for HIV/HBV Coinfected People

HIV-positive people coinfected with hepatitis B virus (HBV) who were treated with 2 dually-active drugs -- one of them being tenofovir -- responded about as well as people taking only lamivudine or emtricitabine at 24 weeks, but over the longer term those on tenofovir plus either lamivudine or emtricitabine were more likely to maintain undetectable HBV viral load, according to a study published in a recent edition of AIDS.

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