Coinfection

CROI 2014 & EASL 2014: Treating Hepatitis B and C in HIV+ People Reduces Liver Disease

Effective antiviral treatment that suppresses hepatitis B virus (HBV) repliaction or eradicates hepatitis C virus (HCV) can lower the risk of developing advanced liver disease including cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, and decompensation in people with HIV and viral hepatitis coinfection, according to studies presented at the recent Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) and EASL International Liver Congress.

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Coverage of the 2014 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections

HIVandHepatitis.com coverage of the 21st Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2014), March 3-6, 2014, in Boston.

Conference highlights include new treatments for hepatitis C, HIV experimental therapies and treatment strategies, HIV cure research, HIV-related conditions, treatment as prevention and PrEP, and HIV/HCV coinfection.

Full listing by topic

Selected presentations and slide webcasts 

3/9/14

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CROI 2014: Retrovirus Conference Starts Monday in Boston

The 21st Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2014) will take place next week, March 3-6, at the Hynes Convention Center in Boston. HIVandHepatitis.com will be on site all week to bring you the latest news coverage about HIV, hepatitis C, and related topics.

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Coverage of the 2014 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections

HIVandHepatitis.com coverage of the 21st Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic infections (CROI 2014), March 3-6, 2014, in Boston.

Conference highlights include new treatments for hepatitis C, HIV experimental therapies and treatment strategies, HIV cure research, HIV-related conditions, treatment as prevention and PrEP, and HIV/HCV coinfection.

Full HIVandHepatitis.com coverage by topic

Selected presentations and slide webcasts 

3/9/14

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AASLD Liver Meeting Starts this Weekend in Washington, DC

The American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD) annual Liver Meeting gets underway this Friday, running November 1-5 at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center in Washington, DC. The highlight of this year's meeting will be numerous presentations on next-generation direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) for hepatitis C, now in late stages of development, both as interferon add-ons and in interferon-free regimens.

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CROI 2014: Retrovirus Conference Now Underway in Boston

The 21st Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2014) kicked off in Boston this week with a program for young investigators, a press conference on new hepatitis C treatments, and opening lectures on HIV immune response and cross-species transmission and an update on the epidemic in West Africa.

HIVandHepatitis.com will be on site all week bringing you the latest news.alt

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Coverage of the 2013 AASLD Liver Meeting

HIVandHepatitis.com coverage of the 64th Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD 2013) in Washington, DC, November 1-5, 2013.

Conference highlights include treatment for hepatitis B and C, new direct-acting HCV drugs, interferon-free hepatitis C therapy, management of liver disease complications, HIV/HBV and HIV/HCV coinfection, and prevention and treatment of hepatocellular carcioma.

Full listing by topic

10/30/13

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CROI 2014: The Role of Interferon in HIV Response [VIDEO]

Although interferon is on its way out as a standard of care for hepatitis C, researchers are learning more about its role in HIV, conference vice chair Julie Overbaugh said at a media briefing on the opening day of the 21st Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2014) this week in Boston.

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ICAAC 2013: Liver Cancer Often Diagnosed Late with Poor Survival in People with HIV

Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is frequently diagnosed at an advanced stage in HIV positive people with hepatitis B or C coinfection, contributing to a high mortality rate that has changed little in recent years, according to a report at the recent 53rd Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (ICAAC 2013) in Denver.

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