Coinfection

Coverage of the 2012 AASLD Liver Meeting

HIVandHepatitis.com coverage of the 63rd Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD 2012) in Boston, November 9-13, 2012.

Conference highlights include treatment for hepatitis B and C, new direct-acting HCV drugs, interferon-free hepatitis C therapy, management of liver disease complications, HIV/HBV and HIV/HCV coinfection, and prevention and treatment of hepatocellular carcioma.

Full listing by topic

HIVandHepatitis.com AASLD 2012 conference section

11/13/12

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Liver Meeting Highlights: New Hep C Drugs, NAFLD, Liver Cancer, Acetaminophen Toxicity, Benefits of Coffee

The American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases Liver Meeting is the premier annual U.S. conference on althepatology, covering all aspects of liver disease including viral hepatitis, fatty liver, hepatocellular carcinoma, and liver transplantation. Kicking off the meeting on Saturday, AASLD President Guadalupe Garcia-Tsao offered a media overview of some highlights selected from the more than 2000 abstracts to be presented during the week.

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ICAAC 2012: Switching to Tenofovir in ART Regimen Suppresses Hepatitis B in HIV/HBV Coinfected

HIV/HBV coinfected people who substituted tenofovir DF (Viread) for zidovudine (AZT; Retrovir) or abacavir (Ziagen) in their antiretroviral regimen saw a reduction in hepatitis B viral load, despite HBV resistance to lamivudine (3TC; Epivir), according to a poster presentation at the 52nd Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (ICAAC) this week in San Francisco.

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AASLD Liver Meeting Starts this Weekend in Boston

The American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD) annual Liver Meeting is underway, running November 9-13 at the Hynes Convention Center in Boston. The AASLD meeting each fall and the European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) International Liver Congress each spring are the premier events for presentation of the latest data on treatment for hepatitis B and C.alt

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AIDS 2012: HIV/HBV Coinfection Linked to Higher Mortality, More ART Liver Toxicity

Approximately 6% of people with HIV receiving antiretroviral treatment in Tanzania were coinfected with hepatitis B virus (HBV), which was associated with an elevated risk of death, smaller CD4 T-cell gains, and greater likelihood of liver toxicity, researchers reported at the recent XIX International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2012) in Washington, DC.

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Tenofovir Leads to HBsAg Clearance in 8% of HIV/HBV Coinfected Patients

Treatment with tenofovir (Viread) led to hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) clearance -- considered the closest outcome to a cure -- in 8% of HIV positive patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) coinfection, and in a subgroup clearance was associated with CD4 T-cell count, Dutch researchers reported in the September 15, 2012, Journal of Infectious Diseases.

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Hepatitis B Linked to More HIV+ Deaths than Hepatitis C, Risk High for People with AIDS

HIV positive men who are coinfected with hepatitis B virus (HBV) are more likely to die than those with hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfection, according to research published in the April 20, 2012, advance online edition of Clinical Infectious Diseases. A related study, however, found that liver-related mortality was quite high for HIV/HCV coinfected people with a diagnosis of AIDS.alt

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ICAAC 2012: Raltegravir Shows Long-term Safety and Efficacy for HIV/HCV and HIV/HBV Coinfection

The HIV integrase inhibitor raltegravir (Isentress) was well-tolerated and demonstrated continued effectiveness for 5 years in treatment-naive and 3 years in treatment-experienced HIV patients coinfected with hepatitis B or C, according to a poster presentation at the 52nd Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (ICAAC) last week in San Francisco.alt

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CROI 2012: Detectable HIV Raises Risk of Incomplete Hepatitis B Suppression

HIV/HBV coinfected people with detectable HIV viral load and higher baseline HBV viral load were less likely to completely suppress hepatitis B after a year on tenofovir (Viread), but CD4 cell count did not show an effect, researchers reported at the 19th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2012) this month in Seattle.alt

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