Coinfection

AASLD 2011: Long-term Tenofovir for HIV/HBV Coinfection

Tenofovir showed long-term antiviral activity against hepatitis B virus (HBV) lasting 5 to 8 years, with minimal evidence of kidney toxicity, and HBsAg levels declined steadily over time, according to 2 posters presented this week at the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases Liver Meeting (AASLD 2011) in San Francisco.

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Hepatitis B and C Coinfection among HIV Positive People in the U.S.

Liver disease and coinfection with hepatitis B or C are common among people with HIV, according to a recent analysis, leading researchers to recommend that viral hepatitis screening, vaccination, and treatment should be considered a priority for HIV positive individuals.alt

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EASL 2011: Kidney Function in HIV/HBV Coinfected People on Tenofovir

Impaired kidney function among people with HIV, HBV, and HIV/HBV coinfection taking tenofovir mainly occurred in those with pre-existing risk factors, researchers reported at EASL 2011. alt

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Hepatitis Delta Found in 15% of HIV/HBV Coinfected People, Increases Risk of Death

Approximately 15% of people with HIV who test positive for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) also carry hepatitis delta virus (HDV), a defective virus that can only replicate in the presence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) but can lead to more severe liver damage, according to a recent European study.

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Tenofovir Remains Effective against Hepatitis B Virus after 5 Years in HIV/HBV Coinfected Patients

Tenofovir (Viread, also in the Truvada and Atripla combination pills) continues to potently suppress both hepatitis B virus (HBV) and HIV in coinfected patients for at least 5 years, according to a study published in the December 2010 issue of Gastroenterology. The findings support current guidelines recommending that HIV/HBV coinfected people should receive an antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimen that includes drugs with dual action against both viruses.

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Treating HIV/HBV Coinfection in Africa

Antiretroviral therapy regimens containing lamivudine did not provide notable benefit or reduce mortality among HIV/HBV coinfected patients in South African, suggesting that tenofovir (Viread) may be a better option.




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Coinfected People May Control HIV but not HBV on a Tenofovir Regimen

More then one-third of people coinfected with HIV and hepatitis B virus (HBV) did not achieve or maintain HBV suppression after 1 year of taking tenofovir (Viread), even though they had undetectable HIV viral load indicating good adherence, according to study findings presented at the recent American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases "Liver Meeting" (AASLD 2010) in Boston.

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Additional HBV Vaccine Dose Offers More Protection for People with HIV

Two alternative dosing schedules of hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccination led to higher levels of protection than the standard 3-dose schedule. alt

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Are IL28B Gene Variations Associated with Outcomes in People with Hepatitis B?

IL28B gene patterns may influence response to interferon therapy for hepatitis B, but this is not as straightforward as it is for hepatitis C, according to a set of studies presented at the recent American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases "Liver Meeting" (AASLD 2010) in Boston. Two analyses suggested that people with the protective rs12979860 C/C pattern were more likely to achieve sustained virological suppression with interferon, but less likely to experience HBeAg seroconversion. A third study, however, found no link between rs12979860 pattern and hepatitis B or HIV persistence or progression.

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