Coinfection

EACS 2015: Successful Hepatitis C Treatment Lowers Risk of Death for HIV/HCV Coinfected People

Hepatitis C treatment that leads to sustained virological response (SVR) -- generally regarded as a cure -- was associated with a reduced risk of liver-related death and improved overall survival in an analysis of 3500 HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfected patients, according to a presentation at the 15th European AIDS Conference last week in Barcelona. A related study found that while some liver-related events are declining over time, liver cancer remains a risk for coinfected people.

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EACS 2015: Sofosbuvir/ Ledipasvir for 8 Weeks Cures Most Hard-to-Treat Hepatitis C in Real Life

Most hepatitis C patients in the GECCO German hepatitis C cohort who were treated with sofosbuvir/ledipasvir (Harvoni) for 8 weeks in a real-world clinical setting achieved sustained virological response, even those who are advised to stay on treatment for 12 weeks due to factors such as liver cirrhosis, prior treatment experience, and high HCV viral load, according to a presentation last week at the 15th European AIDS Conference in Barcelona.

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IDWeek 2015 Features HIV and Hepatitis C Prevention, Treatment, and Cure Research

Immediate antiretroviral therapy is the big HIV news of the year and interferon-free therapy has transformed the treatment of hepatitis C despite its high cost, experts said during an overview of "What's Hot" in the field, presented at the IDWeek 2015 conference taking place this week in San Diego. Participants also heard a keynote talk by Ian Crozier, a doctor who survived Ebola virus disease.

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Coverage of the 15th European AIDS Conference

HIVandHepatitis.com coverage of the 15th European AIDS Conference, sponsored by the European AIDS Clinical Society (EACS), October 21-14, 2015, in Barcelona.

Conference highlights include antiretroviral therapy and treatment strategies, new European HIV treatment guidelines, HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), and treatment for hepatitis C.

Full listing by topic

15th European AIDS Conference website

10/28/15

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Coverage of 2015 Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy

HIVandHepatitis.com coverage of the 55th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (ICAAC), San Diego, September 17-21, 2015.

Highlights of this year's conference include experimental antiretroviral drugs and treatment strategies, HIV prevention, and comorbidities among people with HIV and HIV/HCV coinfection.

Full listing by topic

ICAAC website

10/6/15

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IDWeek 2015: Sofosbuvir + Daclatasvir Demonstrates High Cure Rates for HIV/HCV Coinfected People

Nearly all people with HIV and genotype 1-4 HCV coinfection treated for 12 weeks with an interferon-free regimen of sofosbuvir (Sovaldi) plus daclatasvir (Daklinza) achieved sustained virological response in the ALLY-2 trial, but 8 weeks did not work as well, according to a report in the August 20 New England Journal of Medicine. Substudies presented this month at IDWeek 2015 showed that this regimen is highly effective regardless of race or specific antiretroviral regimen.

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Coverage of IDWeek 2015

HIVandHepatitis.com coverage of IDWeek 2015, October 7-11 in San Diego.

Conference highlights include new HIV therapies and treatment strategies, HIV and hepatitis C continuums of care, and comorbidities among people with HIV and HIV/HCV coinfection, as well as news about antibiotic stewardship and other infectious diseases including Ebola virus.

Full listing of coverage by topic

IDWeek website

10/9/15

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Abacavir/Lamivudine Could Be Driving Liver Damage in People with HIV/HCV Coinfection

Progression of liver fibrosis among ART-treated patients with HIV/HCV coinfection is associated with the type of nucleoside/nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) "backbone," Canadian research published in the September 23 online edition of Clinical Infectious Diseases suggests.

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ICAAC 2015: Comorbidities and Mortality Among HIV-Positive and HIV/HCV Coinfected People

While illness and death due to opportunistic illnesses has declined, people living with HIV remain prone to comorbidities that contribute to hospitalization and reduced survival, according to presentations at the 55th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (ICAAC) last weekin San Diego. Mortality is higher among HIV-positive people coinfected with hepatitis C virus (HCV), and is associated with liver fibrosis progression, offering further evidence supporting prompt hepatitis C treatment.

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