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Acute Hepatitis C

Sex, Genotype, and IL28B Pattern Predict Spontaneous HCV Clearance

Women, people with hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1, and those with a favorable IL28B gene pattern are more likely to spontaneously clear HCV without treatment, while those with unfavorable patterns are more likely to benefit from earlier therapy, according to 2 recent studies.

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Combining HCV Med Boceprevir with Boosted HIV Protease Inhibitors Can Lower Drug Levels

HIV/HCV coinfected people who take the HCV protease inhibitor boceprevir (Victrelis) for hepatitis C treatment along with a ritonavir-boosted HIV protease inhibitor may experience drug-drug interactions that reduce concentrations of both drugs to ineffective levels, Merck warned this week.alt

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HCV Can Be Sexually Transmitted Between HIV+ Men

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is transmitted by sex between HIV positive gay/bisexual men and sexual transmission is responsible for several local epidemics, including one in New York City, according to study findings published recently in the CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.alt

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European Study Does Not See Rapid Long-Term Liver Fibrosis in HIV/HCV Coinfected People

People who are already HIV positive when they acquire hepatitis C virus (HCV) may not experience unusually rapid liver disease progression over the long term, even though the fibrosis progression rate may appear high during the acute stage of infection, according to a European FibroScan study described in the February 15, 2012, issue of Clinical Infectious Diseases.alt

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EASL 2010: HIV/HCV Coinfected Patients with Acute Hepatitis C Are Equally Likely to Achieve Sustained Response with Interferon plus Ribavirin

HIV positive people with acute hepatitis C treated with pegylated interferon plus ribavirin, and HIV negative people treated with pegylated interferon alone, had a similar likelihood of achieving rapid virological response (RVR) at week 4 and sustained virological response (SVR) after completing treatment, according to findings presented at the 45th Annual Meeting of the European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL 2010) last month in Vienna. RVR was the best predictor of SVR, but HIV/HCV coinfected patients had larger HCV viral load reductions between weeks 4 and 12, suggesting that ribavirin promotes "third phase" viral decline.

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