Coinfection

Hepatitis C Cascade Studies Show Gaps in Testing and Treatment

About half of people with hepatitis C are aware of their infection but less than 10% have been successfully treated and achieved sustained virological response, according to a meta-analysis presented at the recent Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2014). A related study found that among HIV/HCV coinfected people, 40% had been referred to hepatitis C care but only 4% were cured.

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CROI 2014: How Fast Does Fibrosis Progress in Acute Hepatitis C Patients with and without HIV?

Liver disease was found to progress slowly in studies of both HIV negative people with newly acquired hepatitis C virus (HCV) and HIV/HCV coinfected people with acute HCV, according to a pair of studies presented at the recent Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections.

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EASL 2014: Sofosbuvir + Ledipasvir Produces Early Cure for 100% of HIV/HCV Coinfected Patients

Treatment for 12 weeks with a coformulation of sofosbuvir plus ledipasvir led to sustained response for all HIV/HCV coinfected individuals with genotype 1 hepatitis C followed for 12 weeks post-treatment, according to interim findings from the ERADICATE study presented at the 49thEASL International Liver Congress (EASL 2014) this week in London.

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Studies Shed Light on Hepatitis C Virus Sexual Transmission among Gay Men

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) transmission among HIV positive gay men has leveled off in Amsterdam -- one of the first cities with an outbreak of apparently sexually transmitted HCV infection -- and it continues to be rare among HIV negative men who have sex with men, according to recent studies. Other research looked at HCV sexual transmission among HIV positive and negative men in Switzerland, and at the association between HCV viral load in blood and semen.

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Hepatitis C Liver Decompensation Remains a Problem for People with HIV Despite Good ART

People with HIV who are coinfected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) continue to have a higher risk for decompensated cirrhosis, or liver failure, even in the era of effective antiretroviral therapy (ART), according to a study published in the March 18 Annals of Internal Medicine. As such, they especially stand to benefit from new interferon-free hepatitis C treatments.

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CROI 2014 & EASL 2014: Treating Hepatitis B and C in HIV+ People Reduces Liver Disease

Effective antiviral treatment that suppresses hepatitis B virus (HBV) repliaction or eradicates hepatitis C virus (HCV) can lower the risk of developing advanced liver disease including cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, and decompensation in people with HIV and viral hepatitis coinfection, according to studies presented at the recent Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) and EASL International Liver Congress.

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Coverage of the 2014 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections

HIVandHepatitis.com coverage of the 21st Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2014), March 3-6, 2014, in Boston.

Conference highlights include new treatments for hepatitis C, HIV experimental therapies and treatment strategies, HIV cure research, HIV-related conditions, treatment as prevention and PrEP, and HIV/HCV coinfection.

Full listing by topic

Selected presentations and slide webcasts 

3/9/14

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Even Moderate Alcohol Use Raises Liver Fibrosis Risk in HIV/HCV Coinfected People

People with HIV alone or hepatitis C virus alone were more likely to have advanced liver fibrosis if they drank more alcohol, but people coinfected with both HIV and HCV had a greater risk of advanced fibrosis even with moderate or "non-hazardous" drinking, according to a report in the May 15 edition of Clinical Infectious Diseases.

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Read more:

Coverage of the 2014 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections

HIVandHepatitis.com coverage of the 21st Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic infections (CROI 2014), March 3-6, 2014, in Boston.

Conference highlights include new treatments for hepatitis C, HIV experimental therapies and treatment strategies, HIV cure research, HIV-related conditions, treatment as prevention and PrEP, and HIV/HCV coinfection.

Full HIVandHepatitis.com coverage by topic

Selected presentations and slide webcasts 

3/9/14

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