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Coinfection

Sustained Response to Pegylated Interferon plus Ribavirin in HIV/HCV Coinfected Patients with Advanced Immune Suppression

HIV/HCV coinfected individuals with advanced immune suppression are about as likely to achieved sustained virological response to interferon-based treatment as coinfected patients with better preserved immune function, but response rates are lower than those for HIV negative chronic hepatitis C patients, according to a report in the October 15, 2009 issue of Clinical Infectious Diseases

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Meta-analysis Shows Hepatitis C Virus Coinfection Does Not Lead to HIV Disease Progression

Coinfection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) is associated with higher mortality among HIV positive individuals in the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) era, but this is not due to an increased risk of progression to AIDS-defining events, according to a meta-analysis described in the November 15, 2009 issue of Clinical Infectious Diseases.

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HIV/HBV Coinfected Patients Respond to ART as well as HIV Monoinfected

HIV positive people coinfected with hepatitis B virus (HBV) respond as well to combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) as individuals with HIV alone, but they are more likely to die due to non-AIDS-related causes, according to a study published in the September 10, 2009 issue of AIDS.

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HIV-HCV Coinfected Patients Are More Likely to Experience HCV Relapse after Completing Treatment, Usually within 12 Weeks

HIV-HCV coinfected patients were less likely than HCV monoinfected individuals to clear HCV by the end of interferon-based therapy and more apt to relapse after completing treament, and therefore were less likely to achieve a sustained virological response (SVR), according to a Spanish study published in the November 1, 2009 issue of Clinical Infectious Diseases.

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HIV-HCV Coinfected Individuals in Italy Are Likely to also Have Occult HBV

Among HIV positive participants in the Italian ICONA cohort, 15% had detectable hepatitis B virus (HBV), and this was almost 3 times more common among patients who were also infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV), according to a study published in the advance online edition of the journal Infection.

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ICAAC 2009: HIV Positive People May Respond Poorly to Pegylated Interferon without Ribavirin for Acute Hepatitis C

Pegylated interferon alone may not be adequate for treatment of acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in HIV positive individuals, and addition of ribavirin "seems necessary" for coinfected patients, according to a small study reported at the 49th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (ICAAC 2009) this week in San Francisco.

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IAS 2009: HIV/HCV Coinfected Patients Treated with NRTI-Sparing Antiretroviral Regimens Respond Better to Pegylated Interferon plus Ribavirin

HIV/HCV coinfected patients treated with pegylated interferon plus ribavirin achieved a sustained virological (SVR) rate of 54% -- the same as HIV negative individuals -- and sustained response was more likely in patients who did not take a nucleoside/nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) as part of their combination antiretroviral regimen.

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ICAAC 2009: Resistance to Hepatitis B Drugs is Common among HIV-HBV Coinfected Patients Receiving Lamivudine-containing ART without Tenofovir (Viread)

Resistance to the hepatitis B drugs adefovir (Hepsera), entecavir (Baraclude), and telbivudine (Tyzeka) is common among HIV-HBV coinfected individuals treated with antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens that include lamivudine (3TC; Epivir) without tenofovir (Viread, also in the Truvada and Atripla coformulations), according to a poster presented at 49th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (ICAAC 2009) this week in San Francisco. These findings support the recommendation that coinfected patients should be treated with ART regimens containing at least 2 drugs with dual activity against HIV and HBV.

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Meta-analysis Shows Concurrent Hepatitis B Increases All-cause Mortality in People with HIV

HIV positive people coinfected with hepatitis B virus (HBV) have a higher rate of all-cause death than people with HIV alone, according to a report in the June 15, 2009 issue of Clinical Infectious Diseases. These results, the study authors stated, suggest that HIV-HBV coinfected individuals may especially benefit from efforts to minimize liver damage.

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