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Coinfection

Tailored Treatment Duration Beneficial for HIV/HCV Coinfected Patients

Extending treatment with pegyalted interferon plus ribavirin for an extra 3 months raises the odds that HIV/HCV genotype 1 or 4 coinfected people will achieve sustained virological response, or a cure for hepatitis C, according to a Spanish study presented at the recent American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases "Liver Meeting" (AASLD 2010) in Boston. Patients with easier-to-treat HCV genotypes 2 or 3, however, did well with 6 months of treatment if they experienced rapid virological response.

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Rapid Liver Disease Progression among HIV Positive Men with Acute Hepatitis C Coinfection

People who already have HIV when they become infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) may experience very rapid liver disease progression, researchers from Mt. Sinai Medical Center reported at the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases "Liver Meeting" (AASLD 2010) held recently in Boston. A detailed review of 4 coinfected patients with persistent HCV viral load revealed progression to decompensated cirrhosis over relatively short periods of time, resulting in persistent symptoms, liver transplantation, or liver-related death. alt

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Worse Fibrosis Predicts Death in HIV/HCV Coinfected Individuals, Interferon Therapy Lowers Risk

HIV/HCV coinfected individuals with more advanced fibrosis have shorter survival than those with less liver damage, but treatment with interferon-based therapy reduces mortality risk, according to findings from a Spanish study presented at the 50th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (ICAAC 2010) recently held in Boston.

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HIV/HCV Coinfected Women More Likely than Men to Modify or Discontinue Hepatitis C Treatment

HIV positive women with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfection experienced side effects of interferon-based therapy that were similar to those of coinfected men, but women developed these side effects sooner and were more likely to discontinue anti-HCV therapy or lower their doses for this reason, according to a study described in the October 1, 2010 Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes. Researchers also found that use of specific antiretroviral drugs can help predict adverse events during hepatitis C treatment.

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AIDS 2010: Drug Resistance Linked to Faster Hepatitis B Liver Disease Progression in HIV/HBV Coinfected Patients

HIV/HBV coinfected individuals may be less likely to have hepatitis B virus (HBV) with mutations conferring resistance to lamivudine (3TC; Epivir), but those who do have drug resistance experience faster liver disease progression and are more likely to develop cirrhosis, according to a study from Romania presented last month at the XVIII International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2010) in Vienna.

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Torque Teno Viruses More Common among HIV/HCV Coinfected People, Linked to Greater Liver Inflammation and Fibrosis

A common but little known set of viruses -- torque teno virus (TTV) and torque teno mini virus (TTMV) -- occur more often in HIV/HCV coinfected individuals than in healthy blood donors, and have been linked to worse liver inflammation and fibrosis progression, according to a poster presented at the 50th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (ICAAC 2010) last week in Boston.

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AIDS 2010: HIV/HCV Coinfected People with Normal Liver Enzymes Respond Well to Interferon-based Therapy

HIV positive people with normal levels of the liver enzyme alanine aminotransferase (ALT) who received hepatitis C therapy using pegylated interferon plus ribavirin responded as well as individuals with elevated ALT, according to findings presented at the XVIII International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2010) last month in Vienna.

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End-of-Treatment Response to Interferon-based Therapy Reduces Liver Failure and Death in HIV/HCV Coinfected Patients

HIV/HCV coinfected individuals who experience an end-of-treatment response to interferon-based therapy for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection had a greatly reduced risk of liver decompensation and liver-related death, even if they did not go on to achieve sustained virological response, according to a Spanish study presented at the 50th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (ICAAC 2010) last week in Boston.

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AIDS 2010: Does Nevirapine Improve Response to Interferon-based Therapy in HIV/HCV Coinfected Patients?

Use of an antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimen containing nevirapine (Viramune) was associated with a higher rate of sustained virological response (SVR) to interferon-based therapy among HIV/HCV coinfected patients, according to a study presented last week at the XVIII International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2010) in Vienna. Researchers suggested that nevirapine may improve treatment response by reducing hepatitis C virus (HCV) viral load, but an alternative explanation may be that people taking nevirapine are in better health when starting hepatitis C treatment.

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