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Coinfection

IAS 2013: HIV/HCV Coinfected People Do Well on HCV Triple Therapy Despite Contraindications

Nearly three-quarters of HIV/HCV coinfected patients in the French HEPAVIH cohort achieved end-of-treatment virological response to hepatitis C treatment with telaprevir plus pegylated interferon/ribavirin, even though one-third had potential contraindications to this type of therapy, according to a report at the 7th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention (IAS 2013) this month in Kuala Lumpur.alt

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Marijuana Does Not Promote Liver Disease Progression in HIV/HCV Coinfected People

Smoking cannabis was not associated with liver fibrosis progression in a study of nearly 700 people with HIV and hepatitis C coinfection, according to a study described in the June 28, 2013, advance edition of Clinical Infectious Diseases.

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CROI 2013: Adding Telaprevir Ups Acute Hepatitis C Cure Rate for HIV+ Men [VIDEO]

Adding telaprevir (Incivek) to pegylated interferon/ribavirin for treating HIV positive men with acute sexually transmitted hepatitis C considerably shortens the duration of therapy and improves the likelihood of a cure, according to study findings presented this week at the 20th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2013) in Atlanta.

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Hepatitis E Can Cause Rapid Liver Cirrhosis in People with HIV Who Have Low CD4 Cell Counts

Infection with hepatitis E virus (HEV) can cause rapid liver fibrosis in people with HIV who have low CD4 cell counts, case reports published in the April 10, 2013, online edition of Clinical Infectious Diseases show. Spanish investigators reported 2 instances of HEV infection in gay men with HIV who had severe immunosuppression. Treatment with ribavirin monotherapy led to normalization of liver function and temporary suppression of HEV replication. 

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Tenofovir plus Emtricitabine or Lamivudine Does Not Always Suppress Hepatitis B in HIV/HBV Coinfected

HIV/HBV coinfected people with high hepatitis B virus (HBV) levels and those who are HBeAg positive are at greater risk of not achieving HBV suppression after a year on tenofovir plus emtricitabine or lamivudine, but most did so eventually, researchers reported in the February 21, 2013, advance online edition of AIDS.

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EASL 2013: HIV/HCV Coinfected at Risk for Decompensation, May Need Prompt Treatment

HIV positive people with hepatitis C coinfection may experience liver decompensation with advanced fibrosis, even before they progress to cirrhosis, and may therefore benefit from earlier antiviral treatment, researchers reported at the EASL International Liver Congress (EASL 2013) last month in Amsterdam.

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AASLD 2012: Final Study Results Show Telaprevir Is Safe and Effective for HIV/HCV Coinfected Patients

HIV/HCV coinfected people treated with telaprevir (Incivek) triple therapy are significantly more likely to achieve sustained virological response, or a cure, than people treated with pegylated interferon/ribavirin alone, according to final results from Study 110 presented at the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases Liver Meeting (AASLD 2012) this week in Boston.alt

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CROI 2013: Adding Telaprevir Increases Acute Hepatitis C Cure Rate for HIV+ Men

Adding telaprevir (Incivek) to pegylated interferon and ribavirin shortens the duration of therapy and improves the likelihood of a cure for HIV positive men with acute sexually transmitted hepatitis C virus (HCV), according to study findings presented at the 20th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2013) last week in Atlanta.

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HIV+ People Who Acquire Hepatitis C May Have Impaired HCV-specific Interferon Response

People who already have HIV when they become infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) appear to have reduced production of cytokines including natural interferons active against HCV, according to a study described in the November 15, 2012, Journal of Infectious Diseases. alt

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