Back HBV Treatment Approved HBV Drugs

Approved HBV Drugs

Antiviral Treatment for Hepatitis B Improves Liver Function after Decompensation

Early treatment with antiviral therapy can restore liver function and increase survival in chronic hepatitis B patients with decompensated cirrhosis who might otherwise need a liver transplant, according to a Korean study published in the June 2015 issue of Hepatology.

alt

Read more:

IDWeek 2014: Hepatitis B Relapse Is Common After Stopping Antiviral Therapy

Hepatitis B virus (HBV) rebounded in nearly 80% of people treated with fully or partially suppressive antiviral therapy using adefovir (Hepsera), entecavir (Baraclude), lamivudine (Epivir), or tenofovir (Viread), indicating that long-term therapy is usually needed to control the virus, researchers reported at IDWeek 2014 last month in Philadelphia.

alt

Read more:

AASLD 2013: Tenofovir for Hepatitis B Remains Safe and Effective Over 7 Years

Chronic hepatitis B patients treated with tenofovir (Viread) for 7 years continued to main viral suppression and liver enzyme normalization, while serological response rates continued to increase, according to a poster presented at the 64th AASLD Liver Meeting last month in Washington, DC. Long-term kidney and bone-related side effects remained uncommon.

alt

Read more:

No Tenofovir Resistance Seen In 2 Years of Hepatitis B Treatment

No cases of resistance to tenofovir (Viread) were detected among chronic hepatitis B patients with prior resistance to lamivudine (3TC or Epivir) through 96 weeks of treatment, according to a study described in the June 11 advance edition of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Adding emtricitabine (Emtriva) did not improve effectiveness compared with tenofovir alone.

alt

Read more:

AASLD 2013: Entecavir + Tenofovir Works Well for Hepatitis B Patients with Prior Treatment Failure

A dual regimen of entecavir (Baraclude) plus tenofovir (Viread) for 48 weeks led to virological response and was generally well-tolerated as second-line therapy for chronic hepatitis B patients who had failed previous nucleoside/nucleotide treatment, according to a poster presentation at the 64th AASLD Liver Meeting last week in Washington, DC.

alt

Read more: