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HBV Policy & Advocacy

U.S. Government Releases Updated Viral Hepatitis Action Plan

On April 3 the federal government released its latest 3-year update to the Action Plan for the Prevention, Care and Treatment of Viral Hepatitis (initially launched in 2011), which provides a framework for strengthening the nation's response to hepatitis B and C.

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DHHS Releases Viral Hepatitis Action Plan

New DHHS report details plan for prevention, care, and treatment of hepatitis B and C. alt

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AASLD and Trust for America's Health Call for Action on Hepatitis B and C

Millions of Americans are living with chronic hepatitis B or C, but many do not know they are infected and are not receiving appropriate care, according to a new report issued by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD) and the Trust for America's Health (TFAH). Over years or decades, chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) or hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection can cause advanced liver disease -- including liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma -- which is projected to be a growing public health concern in the coming years.

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San Francisco Hepatitis C Task Force Issues Recommendations

The San Francisco Hepatitis C Task Force issued a final report in late January, calling on the city to take steps to improve prevention, care, and treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Among the recommendations are expanded testing, establishment of a hepatitis C coordinator within the Department of Public Health, developing education and awareness campaigns, and opening a supervised safe infection facility.

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Advocates Rally in San Francisco and Washington to Raise Awareness and Demand Funding for Hepatitis B an C

Hepatitis advocates gathered in San Francisco and Washington, DC, on May 19 -- World Hepatitis Day -- to bring attention to chronic hepatitis B and C and to call for increased funding for public education, testing, treatment, and care. Speakers described their experiences with stigma, difficulty accessing treatment, and side effects and suboptimal effectiveness of current hepatitis C therapies, while expressing hope for new directing-acting HCV drugs that are expected to start becoming available in the next couple years.

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