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Liver Cancer/HCC

Cancer Is Falling Overall But Liver Cancer Is Rising, Largely Due to Hepatitis B and C

Overall cancer rates have declined significantly in the U.S. over the past decade thanks to better screening and prevention, with the notable exception of liver cancer, according to a new Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer. A majority of liver cancer is caused by hepatitis B virus (HBV), which is preventable with a vaccine, or hepatitis C virus (HCV), which can now be cured in most cases.

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Hepatitis B Vaccine, Hepatitis C Treatment Could Prevent Most Liver Cancer

Widespread vaccination against hepatitis B virus (HBV) and prompt treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) -- which together are the most common cause of hepatocellular carcinoma -- could prevent an estimated 80% of liver cancer deaths, according to the World Hepatitis Alliance in an announcement commemorating World Cancer Day.

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Everolimus Did Not Improve Survival for Advanced Liver Cancer Patients

The mTOR inhibitor everolimus (Afinator) failed to increase overall survival for people with advanced hepatocellular carccinoma (HCC) who were previously unsuccessfully treated with sorafenib, according to results from the EVOLVE-1 trial published in the July 2 edition of JAMA.

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ASCO 2015: PD-1 Checkpoint Inhibitor Nivolumab Shows Promise against Liver Cancer

Bristol-Myers Squibb's PD-1 immune checkpoint inhibitor nivolumab (Opdivo) was a star of the show at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) annual meeting this week in Chicago, with study results showing that the drug demonstrated anti-tumor activity against hepatocellular carcinoma in a Phase 1/2 study, along with further Phase 3 evidence of its effectiveness against lung cancer and melanoma.

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Antiviral Treatment for Hepatitis B Lowers Risk of Liver Cancer

Antiviral therapy for chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection can reduce the risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), even among people with high HBV viral load, according to research described in the May 2014 edition of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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