Coinfection

CROI 2011: HIV/HCV Coinfected People Have Higher Risk of Bone Loss

People with both HIV and hepatitis C are more likely to sustain hip or spine fractures than people with one or none of these viruses, according to a study of nearly 39,000 Medicaid recipients presented at CROI 2011. alt

Read more:

CROI 2011: Interactions of HIV Meds with HCV drugs Telaprevir and Boceprevir

New HCV antiviral drugs can interact with some antiretroviral drugs for HIV, but others are not affected and HIV/HCV coinfected patients can be treated successfully with minimal dose adjustments.alt

Read more:

Tailored Treatment Duration Beneficial for HIV/HCV Coinfected Patients

Extending treatment with pegyalted interferon plus ribavirin for an extra 3 months raises the odds that HIV/HCV genotype 1 or 4 coinfected people will achieve sustained virological response, or a cure for hepatitis C, according to a Spanish study presented at the recent American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases "Liver Meeting" (AASLD 2010) in Boston. Patients with easier-to-treat HCV genotypes 2 or 3, however, did well with 6 months of treatment if they experienced rapid virological response.

Read more:

CROI 2011: Acute Hepatitis C Treatment for HIV/HCV Coinfected People

About 65% of coinfected patients with HCV genotypes 1 or 4, and 81% with genotypes 2 or 3, achieved sustained response to interferon-based therapy started during acute infection, researchers reported at CROI 2011.

Read more:

Rapid Liver Disease Progression among HIV Positive Men with Acute Hepatitis C Coinfection

People who already have HIV when they become infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) may experience very rapid liver disease progression, researchers from Mt. Sinai Medical Center reported at the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases "Liver Meeting" (AASLD 2010) held recently in Boston. A detailed review of 4 coinfected patients with persistent HCV viral load revealed progression to decompensated cirrhosis over relatively short periods of time, resulting in persistent symptoms, liver transplantation, or liver-related death. alt

Read more:

Sexual Transmission of Hepatitis C among HIV Positive Men in the U.S. and Australia

Nearly three-quarters of new hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections among HIV positive gay and bisexual men in the U.S. are likely due to sexual transmission, according to an analysis described in the January 31, 2011 advance online issue of Clinical Infectious Diseases. An Australian study published in the same issue found that sexual transmission accounted for a majority of cases among men who have sex with men, but injection drug use also played a role. These findings suggest that HIV positive people who have risky sex should undergo regular hepatitis C testing.

Read more:

Danish Study Looks at Hepatitis C Sexual Transmission among HIV Positive Gay Men

Less than 1% of HIV positive gay and bisexual men seen at a Danish hospital were found to have acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, according to a study presented at the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases "Liver Meeting" (AASLD 2010) this week in Boston. All those who started hepatitis C treatment within 6 months of becoming infected achieved rapid virological response, while 1 who started later experienced HCV relapse.

Read more:

ICAAC 2011: HCV Drug Telaprevir Shows No Problematic Interactions with Raltegravir

The new hepatitis C virus (HCV) protease inhibitor telaprevir (Incivek) does not appear to have clinically relevant drug-drug interactions with the HIV integrase inhibitor raltegravir (Isentress), according to a study presented at the 51st Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (ICAAC 2011) last month in Chicago.alt

Read more:

HIV/HCV Coinfected Women More Likely than Men to Modify or Discontinue Hepatitis C Treatment

HIV positive women with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfection experienced side effects of interferon-based therapy that were similar to those of coinfected men, but women developed these side effects sooner and were more likely to discontinue anti-HCV therapy or lower their doses for this reason, according to a study described in the October 1, 2010 Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes. Researchers also found that use of specific antiretroviral drugs can help predict adverse events during hepatitis C treatment.

Read more: