Coinfection

HIV/HCV Coinfected Veterans Have Elevated Risk of Chronic Kidney Disease

HIV positive people coinfected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) are more likely to have chronic kidney disease than individuals with HIV alone, and kidney disease is linked to significantly greater risk of death, according to a study of U.S. veterans described in the February 2010 Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes.

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Elevated ALT Liver Enzymes in HIV Patients without Hepatitis B or C Are Linked to High Viral Load, Obesity, Alcohol, and Some NRTIs

Among HIV positive individuals without coexisting hepatitis C virus (HCV) or hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, the incidence of persistent elevated ALT levels was 3.9 cases per 100 person-years, researchers reported in the February 15, 2010 issue of Clinical Infectious Diseases. The risk of ALT elevation was greater in people with high HIV RNA levels, higher body mass index (BMI), heavy alcohol use, and prolonged use of stavudine (d4T; Zerit) or zidovudine (AZT; Retrovir).

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Sustained Response to Pegylated Interferon plus Ribavirin in HIV/HCV Coinfected Patients with Advanced Immune Suppression

HIV/HCV coinfected individuals with advanced immune suppression are about as likely to achieved sustained virological response to interferon-based treatment as coinfected patients with better preserved immune function, but response rates are lower than those for HIV negative chronic hepatitis C patients, according to a report in the October 15, 2009 issue of Clinical Infectious Diseases

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Liver Transplant Do Not Impair Immune Response in HIV/HCV Coinfected Patients

HIV/HCV coinfected patients who undergo liver transplantation do not lose immune responses to hepatitis C virus (HCV), HIV, or opportunistic infections, according to an analysis reported in the December 2009 Journal of Hepatology. This study adds to the evidence that appropriately selected coinfected individuals can be suitable candidates for liver transplants.

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Meta-analysis Shows Hepatitis C Virus Coinfection Does Not Lead to HIV Disease Progression

Coinfection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) is associated with higher mortality among HIV positive individuals in the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) era, but this is not due to an increased risk of progression to AIDS-defining events, according to a meta-analysis described in the November 15, 2009 issue of Clinical Infectious Diseases.

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Larger Viral Decline during Hepatitis C Treatment in HIV/HCV Coinfected People with Favorable IL28B Pattern

HIV/HCV coinfected patients with the C/C IL28B gene pattern experience larger decreases in hepatitis C virus (HCV) levels during the first phase of viral decline after starting treatment with pegylated interferon plus ribavirin, and were more likely to achieve virological response, researchers reported in the December 19, 2010 advance online edition of the Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes. A similar effect was seen for second-phase viral decline in people with HCV genotype 1, but not genotype 3.

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AASLD 2009: Study Looks at Factors Affecting Survival of HIV/HCV Coinfected Liver Transplant Recipients

While HIV/HCV coinfected patients can have good outcomes after liver transplantation, acute organ rejection remains a risk factor and survival does not match that of HIV negative people with hepatitis C virus (HCV) alone, according to a study presented at the 60th Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD 2009) this month in Boston.

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Factors that Influence the Decision of HIV/HCV Coinfected Patients to Start Treatment for Hepatitis C

It is estimated that nearly 30% of HIV positive people are coinfected with hepatitis C virus (HCV), and liver disease is a leading cause of death in this population. However, only a small number of HIV/HCV coinfected patients receive treatment for hepatitis C due to a variety of factors, according to an article published in the November 22, 2009 online edition of AIDS Patient Care and STDS.

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Rapid Liver Fibrosis Progression and Successful Treatment of Acute Infection Suggest Benefits of Routine HCV Screening for HIV Positive Men

Researchers from Mt. Sinai School of Medicine presented data last week at the 60th Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD) in Boston that further characterize a cohort of HIV positive men with apparently sexually transmitted acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. This group continues to experience more rapid than expected liver fibrosis progression. Hepatitis C treatment has been highly successful if started during the acute phase, but less so thereafter. The researchers recommended routine ALT and HCV antibody testing to allow for prompt treatment and to prevent liver disease progression.alt

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