Coinfection

HIV Coinfection Does Not Worsen Liver Transplant Outcomes in People with Hepatitis B or C

HIV positive liver transplant recipients with hepatitis B virus (HBV) or hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfection did not fare worse overall than HIV negative people, according to a Spanish study presented at the 50th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (ICAAC 2010) last month in Boston. Coinfected patients were less likely to experience organ rejection, but HCV recurrence was a leading cause of adverse outcomes.

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Does CD4 Cell Count Influence Liver Fibrosis in HIV/HCV Coinfected People?

Neither current nor lowest-ever CD4 T-cell levels were associated with hepatitis C virus (HCV) viral load or severity of liver fibrosis in HIV positive people after adjusting for other factors, according to a Spanish study presented at the recent 50th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (ICAAC 2010) in Boston.

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AIDS 2010: HIV/HCV Coinfected People with Normal Liver Enzymes Respond Well to Interferon-based Therapy

HIV positive people with normal levels of the liver enzyme alanine aminotransferase (ALT) who received hepatitis C therapy using pegylated interferon plus ribavirin responded as well as individuals with elevated ALT, according to findings presented at the XVIII International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2010) last month in Vienna.

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Torque Teno Viruses More Common among HIV/HCV Coinfected People, Linked to Greater Liver Inflammation and Fibrosis

A common but little known set of viruses -- torque teno virus (TTV) and torque teno mini virus (TTMV) -- occur more often in HIV/HCV coinfected individuals than in healthy blood donors, and have been linked to worse liver inflammation and fibrosis progression, according to a poster presented at the 50th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (ICAAC 2010) last week in Boston.

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HIV/HCV Coinfection, but Not HIV Alone, Raises Risk of Liver-related Death

HIV positive people coinfected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) had an elevated mortality rate compared with the general population in Spain, but this was not the case for individuals with HIV alone, according to a study presented at the XVIII International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2010) last month in Vienna.

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End-of-Treatment Response to Interferon-based Therapy Reduces Liver Failure and Death in HIV/HCV Coinfected Patients

HIV/HCV coinfected individuals who experience an end-of-treatment response to interferon-based therapy for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection had a greatly reduced risk of liver decompensation and liver-related death, even if they did not go on to achieve sustained virological response, according to a Spanish study presented at the 50th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (ICAAC 2010) last week in Boston.

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AIDS 2010: Does Nevirapine Improve Response to Interferon-based Therapy in HIV/HCV Coinfected Patients?

Use of an antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimen containing nevirapine (Viramune) was associated with a higher rate of sustained virological response (SVR) to interferon-based therapy among HIV/HCV coinfected patients, according to a study presented last week at the XVIII International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2010) in Vienna. Researchers suggested that nevirapine may improve treatment response by reducing hepatitis C virus (HCV) viral load, but an alternative explanation may be that people taking nevirapine are in better health when starting hepatitis C treatment.

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Worse Fibrosis Predicts Death in HIV/HCV Coinfected Individuals, Interferon Therapy Lowers Risk

HIV/HCV coinfected individuals with more advanced fibrosis have shorter survival than those with less liver damage, but treatment with interferon-based therapy reduces mortality risk, according to findings from a Spanish study presented at the 50th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (ICAAC 2010) recently held in Boston.

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National Viral Hepatitis Roundtable Applauds National AIDS Strategy's Recognition of HIV/HCV Coinfection

The National Viral Hepatitis Roundtable (NVHR) praised the inclusion of hepatitis B and C coinfection in the White House Office of National AIDS Policy's National HIV/AIDS Strategy released last week, given that an about 30% of HIV positive people also have HCV and approximately 10% also have HBV. The advocates also expressed hope that the administration will take a similar comprehensive approach to hepatitis B and C monoinfection, the latter of which affects about 4 times as many people as HIV.

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