Coinfection

EASL 2010: Biopsy Study Suggests Liver Disease Does Not Progress Faster in HIV/HCV Coinfected People

A poster presented last week at the 45th Annual Meeting of the European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL 2010) in Vienna suggests that HIV/HCV coinfection may not significantly accelerate liver fibrosis progression compared with HCV alone. This biopsy study adds to a conflicting body of evidence about the impact of HIV on hepatitis C pathogenesis.

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CROI 2010: HIV/HCV Coinfected Patients Demonstrate Poorer Neurocognitive Performance, but No Difference in Neural Imaging

HIV/HCV coinfected individuals with good HIV suppression on performed more poorly than HIV monoinfected people on neurocognitive tests, but the 2 groups showed no significant differences in neural imaging measures, according to a study presented at the recent 17th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections in San Francisco (CROI 2010).

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CROI 2010: More Evidence of Rapid Liver Disease Progression in HIV/HCV Coinfected People, but Antiretroviral Therapy Lowers Risk

A study from Spain adds to the evidence that liver fibrosis due to hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection may progress unusually fast in people with HIV. However, the investigators reported at the 17th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2010) last month in San Francisco, effective antiretroviral therapy (ART) that suppresses HIV and raises CD4 cell count reduces the risk of liver disease progression.

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HIV/HCV Coinfection Fell along with Injection Drug Use among Men in HOPS; WIHS Women Appear Prone to HCV Sexual Transmission

Two recently published studies looked at the epidemiology of HIV/HCV coinfection in large, long-term cohort studies. Among men in the HIV Outpatient Study (HOPS), the HIV/HCV coinfection rate declined between 1996 and 2007, corresponding to a drop in the proportion of new HIV infections attributable to injection drug use. In the Women's Interagency HIV Study (WIHS), however, a considerable number of women who acquired hepatitis C virus (HCV) did not inject drugs but had partners who did, suggesting that sexual transmission occurs more often than previously assumed.

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CROI 2010: Moderate Liver Fibrosis Predicts Disease and Death in HIV/HCV Coinfected People, but Successful Treatment Appears Protective

Even moderate liver fibrosis (greater than stage F1) in HIV/HCV coinfected patients is associated with adverse clinical outcomes including liver cancer, liver failure, and death, investigators reported at the 17th Conference on Retroviruses & Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2010) last week in San Francisco. However, effective HIV treatment producing long-term viral suppression and successful hepatitis C treatment leading to sustained virological response appeared to be protective.

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CROI 2010: HIV/HBV and HIV/HCV Coinfected People with Impaired Liver Function and Inflammation Have Higher Risk of Non-AIDS Death

HIV positive study participants with hepatitis B virus (HBV) or hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfection who had higher blood levels of biomarkers associated with impaired liver function and inflammation were more likely to die of non-AIDS-related causes, researchers with the SMART treatment interruption trial reported last month at the 17th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2010) in San Francisco.

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CROI 2010: Leakage of Gut Bacteria Linked to Poor Hepatitis C Treatment Response in HIV/HCV Coinfected Patients

HIV/HCV coinfected individuals who did not respond well to interferon-based therapy for hepatitis C showed evidence of greater microbial translocation -- leakage of bacteria due to HIV damaging the gut -- than early responders, although T-cell activation did not differ, according to a poster presentation at the 17th Conference on Retroviruses & Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2010) last week in San Francisco.

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CROI 2010: HIV Infection and HIV/HCV Coinfection Increased Risk of Strokes in Veterans Study

HIV positive veterans had about twice the risk of having a stroke as their HIV negative counterparts, and being coinfected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) further elevated the risk, but hepatitis C alone conferred an insignificant increase, according to a poster presented at the 17th Conference on Retroviruses & Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2010) last month in San Francisco. The researchers suggested stroke death may have been underestimated in the past.

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Does Liver Fibrosis Progress Faster in People Who Have HIV When They Acquire Hepatitis C?

HIV positive men who subsequently became infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) appeared to have a suspiciously rapid rate of liver disease progression in the European NEAT study, according to a poster presented at the 17th Conference on Retroviruses & Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2010) this week in San Francisco. The researchers suggested that apparent fast progression might be attributable to short duration of follow-up.

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