HPV Vaccines

Single Dose of Human Papillomavirus Vaccine May Prevent Most Cervical Cancer

Just 1 dose of the Cervarix human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine was able to protect 85% of young women against cancer-causing HPV types 16 and 18, suggesting that it could prevent a majority of cervical cancer cases, including in settings were administration of the full 3-dose series is difficult, according to an analysis of data from 2 large trials published in the June 9 edition of Lancet Oncology.

alt

Read more:

12. New Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Protects Against 9 Strains

In December the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved a new "9-valent" human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine from Merck that protects against more cancer-causing strains. The new Gardasil 9 vaccine is expected to prevent about 90% of cervical, anal, and genital cancers. The vaccine is approved for young women ages 9-26 and young men ages 9-15.

alt

Read more:

FDA Approves New Vaccine Effective Against 9 Types of Human Papillomavirus

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration this week approved a new "9-valent" human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine from Merck that protects against infection with more high-risk or cancer-causing strains. The new Gardasil 9 vaccine is expected to prevent about 90% of cervical, anal, and genital cancers. The vaccine is approved for young women ages 9-26 and young men ages 9-15.

alt

Read more:

WHO Recommends 2-Dose Vaccine, HPV Screening for Cervical Cancer Prevention

The World Health Organization (WHO) last week released new guidance for preventing and controlling cervical cancer, which causes more than 270,000 deaths annually worldwide. The guidelines call for girls to receive 2 rather than 3 doses of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine and for women to be screened using less frequent HPV tests rather than Pap smears.

alt

Read more:

AIDS 2014: Young People with HIV Respond Well to Human Papillomavirus Vaccine

The quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine worked as well for teens and young adults with HIV as it did for their HIV negative counterparts, according to study findings presented the 20thInternational AIDS Conference last week in Melbourne.

alt

Read more: