HPV Vaccines

Black Women More Likely to Carry Human Papillomavirus Strains Not Covered by Vaccines

African-American women with precancerous cervical abnormalities are about half as likely to have cancer-causing human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16 and 18, and more likely to have other types for which the Gardasil and Cervarix vaccines do not provide protection, according to a study presented at the American Association for Cancer Research International Conference on Frontiers in Cancer Prevention Research taking pace this week in Maryland.

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IDWeek 2013: HIV+ Young Women Have Adequate Response to Human Papillomavirus Vaccine

HIV positive girls did not respond as well to the quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine as HIV negative girls of the same age, but they responded as well as HIV negative older women, probably giving them sufficient protection from infection, according to a late-breaker presentation at the recent IDWeek conference in San Francisco.

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HPV Vaccine Prevents Oral Infection, May Lower Risk of Mouth and Throat Cancer

Vaccination against human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16 and 18 reduced oral infection by more than 90% in a large study in Costa Rica, which is likely to bring down the rate of mouth and throat cancers in years to come, according to a report in the July 17, 2013, online edition of PLoS ONE.

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IDWeek 2013: Low-income Girls Are Less Likely to Receive Full HPV Vaccine Series

altLow-income adolescents are not as likely to start or finish the 3-shot human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine series, which reduces the risk of cervical cancer. Cultural differences can help explain some of the reasons for this disparity and suggest targeted approaches for encouraging vaccination, researchers reported at Second IDWeek conference this week in San Francisco.

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IAS 2013: HPV Vaccination May Prevent Anal Cancer in Older Gay Men

A large number of infections with anal cancer-associated strains of human papillomavirus (HPV) among older gay men could be prevented with the use of HPV vaccines, Australian research reported at the recent 7th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention (IAS 2013) in Kuala Lumpur. A related analysis showed that high-grade pre-cancerous cell changes were common but often resolved spontaneously.

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