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Human Papillomavirus (HPV)

ASCO 2016: PD-1 Blocker Nivolumab Shows Promise for Advanced Anal Cancer

The checkpoint inhibitor nivolumab(Opdivo), a monoclonal antibody targeting the PD-1 receptor, demonstrated activity against metastatic anal cancer that in patients who did not respond to prior treatment, according to research presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) annual meeting this week in Chicago. 70% of participants in this small study experienced complete or partial response or stabilized disease.

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CDC Releases Updated Sexually Transmitted Disease Treatment Guidelines

In June the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) published updates guidelines for the treatment of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). The guidelines include information on more than 2 dozen different sexually transmitted infections, as well as STD complications such as pelvic inflammatory disease and cervical and anal cancer.

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CROI 2015: Screening May Miss Pre-cancerous Anal Lesions in Women with HIV

Existing algorithms to screen for anal cancer in women living with HIV could be missing many cases of anal high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL) -- abnormal tissue changes that may be a precursor to invasive anal cancer -- according to a study reported at the recent 2015 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) in Seattle. 

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Single Dose of Human Papillomavirus Vaccine May Prevent Most Cervical Cancer

Just 1 dose of the Cervarix human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine was able to protect 85% of young women against cancer-causing HPV types 16 and 18, suggesting that it could prevent a majority of cervical cancer cases, including in settings were administration of the full 3-dose series is difficult, according to an analysis of data from 2 large trials published in the June 9 edition of Lancet Oncology.

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12. New Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Protects Against 9 Strains

In December the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved a new "9-valent" human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine from Merck that protects against more cancer-causing strains. The new Gardasil 9 vaccine is expected to prevent about 90% of cervical, anal, and genital cancers. The vaccine is approved for young women ages 9-26 and young men ages 9-15.

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