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Human Papillomavirus (HPV)

ICAAC 2014: Anal HPV Infection and Dysplasia Common in HIV+ Women and Gay Men

Anal infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) types was common among women with HIV in France, while a Spanish study found a low rate of pre-cancerous anal cell changes in HIV positive women compared with men who have sex with men, researchers reported at the recent 54th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy in Washington, DC.

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AIDS 2014: Young People with HIV Respond Well to Human Papillomavirus Vaccine

The quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine worked as well for teens and young adults with HIV as it did for their HIV negative counterparts, according to study findings presented the 20thInternational AIDS Conference last week in Melbourne.

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FDA Approves HPV DNA Test as Pap Smear Alternative for Cervical Cancer Screening

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) last week approved Roche Diagnostics' cobas human papillomavirus (HPV DNA test for initial screening for cervical cancer. The test detects high-risk or cancer-causing HPV types including HPV-16 and HPV-18. Women who test positive for high-risk HPV can then undergo further testing for pre-cancerous or malignant cell changes.

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Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Is Effective for Women with HIV

HIV positive women respond well to the Gardasil human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, offering them protection against cervical cancer, according to a study published in the April 14 electronic edition of Clinical Infectious Diseases. Related recent research found that both Gardasil and Cervarix are effective in people with HIV.

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CROI 2014: Natural History of HIV-Related Anal Dysplasia [VIDEO]

The progression of anal dysplasia is highly variable in people with HIV, progressing in some and remaining stable or regressing in others, according to a retrospective analysis of nearly 3000 participants presented at the 21st Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2014) last week in Boston. Progression to invasive anal cancer, however, was uncommon.

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