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Anal & Cervical Cancer

CROI 2015: Screening May Miss Pre-cancerous Anal Lesions in Women with HIV

Existing algorithms to screen for anal cancer in women living with HIV could be missing many cases of anal high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL) -- abnormal tissue changes that may be a precursor to invasive anal cancer -- according to a study reported at the recent 2015 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) in Seattle. 

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WHO Recommends 2-Dose Vaccine, HPV Screening for Cervical Cancer Prevention

The World Health Organization (WHO) last week released new guidance for preventing and controlling cervical cancer, which causes more than 270,000 deaths annually worldwide. The guidelines call for girls to receive 2 rather than 3 doses of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine and for women to be screened using less frequent HPV tests rather than Pap smears.

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AIDS 2014: Anal Lesions Often Resolve Without Treatment In HIV Positive Gay Men

High-grade anal dysplasia is common among gay men living with HIV, but it often resolves spontaneously and routine treatment may not be beneficial, according to results from the Australian SPANC study presented this week at the 20th International AIDS Conference in Melbourne.

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FDA Approves New Vaccine Effective Against 9 Types of Human Papillomavirus

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration this week approved a new "9-valent" human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine from Merck that protects against infection with more high-risk or cancer-causing strains. The new Gardasil 9 vaccine is expected to prevent about 90% of cervical, anal, and genital cancers. The vaccine is approved for young women ages 9-26 and young men ages 9-15.

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CROI 2014: Natural History of HIV-Related Anal Dysplasia [VIDEO]

The progression of anal dysplasia is highly variable in people with HIV, progressing in some and remaining stable or regressing in others, according to a retrospective analysis of nearly 3000 participants presented at the 21st Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2014) last week in Boston. Progression to invasive anal cancer, however, was uncommon.

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