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Approved HIV Drugs

6. HIV Drugs: Few New Approvals, but Pipeline Looks Promising

HIV drug development news in 2014 included approval of a new single-tablet regimen and 2 more components of antiretroviral therapy (ART). Promising candidates in the pipeline include a better-tolerated version of tenofovir, a NNRTI with fewer neuropsychiatric side effects, and potential long-acting injectables that may be useful for treatment or pre-exposure prophylaxis.

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HIV Drug Therapy: Lower-dose Efavirenz Equally Effective with Fewer Side Effects

A reduced dose of efavirenz (Sustiva or Stocrin) for first-line HIV therapy suppressed viral load as well as the standard dose, but was associated with fewer characteristic side effects, researchers reported at the recent HIV Drug Therapy 2014 meeting in Glasgow. A related study found that half the dose maintained viral suppression in people with high efavirenz levels in their blood.

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HIV Drug Therapy: Once-daily Dolutegravir Superior to Darunavir at 96 Weeks

Treatment with a triple antiretroviral combination containing the once-daily integrase inhibitor dolutegravir (Tivicay) is superior to the ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitor darunavir (Prezista) over 96 weeks of follow-up, Jean-Michel Molina of the Hôpital Saint Louis, Paris, reported this month at the HIV Drug Therapy Glasgow conference.

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HIV Drug Therapy: Efavirenz Not Linked to Higher Suicide Risk in D:A:D Cohort

People taking antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens containing the NNRTI efavirenz (Sustiva) were not more likely to die due to suicide or psychiatric illness than those taking other drugs in the large D:A:D cohort, researchers reported last month at the HIV Drug Therapy 2014 meeting in Glasgow.

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HIV Drug Therapy: Darunavir/Ritonavir Protease Inhibitor Monotherapy Less Effective than 3-Drug ART

Monotherapy with ritonavir-boosted darunavir (Prezista) results in a lower rate of viral suppression after 48 weeks when compared to darunavir/ritonavir plus 2 nucleoside/nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), but may be just as effective as 3-drug therapy in people with nadir (lowest-ever) CD4 cell counts above 200 cells/mm3, according to a 48-week analysis of the PROTEA study presented last week at the HIV Drug Therapy Glasgow conference.

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