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Approved HIV Drugs

BMS Licenses Atazanavir to Medicines Patent Pool, Allowing Cheaper Generics

Bristol-Myers Squibb and the Medicines Patent Pool have reached a licensing agreement that will enable generic drug manufacturers to produce inexpensive versions of the HIV protease inhibitor atazanavir (Reyataz), as well as fixed-dose combinations containing the drug, for use in low-income countries, MPP recently announced. It is the first MPP agreement to cover a preferred second-line therapy.

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HIV Integrase Inhibitor Elvitegravir Approved in European Union

The next-generation HIV integrase inhibitor elvitegravir has been approved by the European Commission, to be marketed under the brand name Vitekta, according to an announcement this week from developer Gilead Sciences. It is indicated for use in combination antiretriviral regimens containing a ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitor.

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EACS 2013: Once-daily Raltegravir Effective as Maintenance Therapy; New Formulation in Development

Almost all HIV positive people with undetectable viral load who switched to once-daily raltegravir (Isentress) maintained viral suppression, French researchers reported at the 14thEuropean AIDS Conference this month in Brussels. In an effort to facilitate once-daily dosing, Merck is working on a new tablet that appears less affected by food than the current formulation.

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U.S. HIV Treatment Guidelines Expand Integrase Inhibitor Recommendations

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services antiretroviral therapy guidelines panel has updated its list of preferred regimens for first-line treatment to include 2 additional HIV integrase inhibitors, elvitegravir (part of the Stribild single-tablet regimen) and dolutegravir (Tivicay).

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EACS 2013: Dolutegravir Matches or Beats Other Antiretrovirals for First-line HIV Treatment

The recently approved HIV integrase inhibitor dolutegravir (Tivicay) provides at least equivalent antiviral efficacy and better tolerability compared with approved antiretroviral drugs for treatment-naive people, according to data reported at the 14th European AIDS Conference last week in Brussels and in the current edition of Lancet Infectious Diseases.

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