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Liver Disease Is Leading Cause of Death for People with Chronic Hepatitis B

Advanced liver disease caused by hepatitis B virus (HBV) -- including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and decompensated cirrhosis -- accounted for more than 40% of deaths of people with chronic hepatitis B in a large health maintenance organization, researchers reported in the December 12, 2012, advance online edition of Hepatology.

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Antiviral Therapy Safe and Effective for Hep B Patients with Advanced Cirrhosis

Antiviral drugs including entecavir (Baraclude), lamivudine (Epivir-HBV), telbivudine (Tyzeka), and tenofovir (Viread) are generally well-tolerated and effective against hepatitis B virus (HBV) in people with liver cirrhosis, and may lower mortality even among patients with severe decompensated cirrhosis, according to 2 recently published studies.alt

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Tenofovir Improves Outcomes of HBV Acute-on-Chronic Liver Failure

Treatment with tenofovir (Viread) lowers HBV viral load, reduces liver injury, and decreases the risk of death in patients with acute-on-chronic liver failure due to hepatitis B reactivation. alt

 

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Entecavir vs Adefovir in Hepatitis B Patients with Liver Decompensation

In a head-to-head comparison, entecavir (Baraclude) demonstrated superior virological efficacy compared to adefovir (Hepsera) in hepatitis B patients with decompensated liver disease.alt

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EASL 2010: Measurable Neurocognitive Impairment Persists after Episodes of Hepatic Encephalopathy in People with Liver Cirrhosis

Changes in working memory, psychomotor speed, and other neurocognitive measures persist in patients with hepatic encephalopathy due to decompensated liver cirrhosis, according to research presented at the 45th Annual Meeting of the European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL 2010) last month in Vienna. A related study presented at the Digestive Disease Week conference (DDW 2010) last week in New Orleans found that more than half of people with compensated cirrhosis (mostly due to hepatitis C) showed signs of neurocognitive impairment, indicating that mild hepatic encephalopathy is common even among individuals without severe liver disease.

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