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Screening and Post-Natal Prophylaxis Reduce Mother-to-Child HBV Transmission

Prenatal screening of pregnant women for hepatitis B virus (HBV), followed by immune prophylaxis for infants using injected hepatitis B antibodies and the first dose of the HBV vaccine given soon after delivery, resulted in a low rate of vertical HBV transmission -- less than 1 per 100 births -- in a real-world study described in the May 27 advance edition of Annals of Internal Medicine.

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EASL 2014: Sci-B-Vac Bests Engerix-B for Preventing Mother-to-Child HBV Transmission

An investigational vaccine known as Sci-B-Vac given to babies born to women with hepatitis B was more effective at preventing HBV infection than the widely used Engerix-B vaccine, according to a report at the EASL International Liver Congress this month in London.

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Registry Data Show Hepatitis B Medications Appear Safe during Pregnancy

An analysis of data from the Antiretroviral Pregnancy Registry found no evidence that pregnant women's use of drugs to treat chronic hepatitis B -- including lamivudine (Epivir) and tenofovir (Viread) -- is associated with birth defects, according to a report in the November 2012 Journal of Hepatology. alt

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IDWeek 2013: Tenofovir May Help Prevent Mother-to-child Hepatitis B Transmission

Taking tenofovir (Viread) during the final months of pregnancy may provide extra protection against perinatal transmission of hepatitis B virus (HBV), along with immunization of the infant, according to a late-breaker presentation the Second IDWeek conference last week in San Francisco.alt

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ICAAC 2012: Switching to Tenofovir in ART Regimen Suppresses Hepatitis B in HIV/HBV Coinfected

HIV/HBV coinfected people who substituted tenofovir DF (Viread) for zidovudine (AZT; Retrovir) or abacavir (Ziagen) in their antiretroviral regimen saw a reduction in hepatitis B viral load, despite HBV resistance to lamivudine (3TC; Epivir), according to a poster presentation at the 52nd Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (ICAAC) this week in San Francisco.alt

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