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Registry Data Show Hepatitis B Medications Appear Safe during Pregnancy

An analysis of data from the Antiretroviral Pregnancy Registry found no evidence that pregnant women's use of drugs to treat chronic hepatitis B -- including lamivudine (Epivir) and tenofovir (Viread) -- is associated with birth defects, according to a report in the November 2012 Journal of Hepatology. alt

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Resources for People with HIV and Hepatitis and Providers in Disaster Areas

During disasters such as Hurricane Sandy, people with chronic medical conditions including HIV and viral hepatitis will be among those displaced and requiring emergency care. Government agencies offer a number of resources for people with these and other chronic conditions, healthcare providers, and others who provide emergency and disaster-related services.

[Editor's note: This resource list will be updated as further information becomes available.]
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Entecavir (Baraclude) Label Adds Data on Black Patients and Liver Transplant Recipients with HBV

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration this week approved revised product information for entecavir (Baraclude) for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, adding new data from studies of African-American patients -- showing no differences in pharmacokinetics or safety -- and of people who received liver transplants. alt

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Hepatitis B Patients with HBeAg Seroconversion on Treatment May Not Have Durable Response

People with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) who achieve hepatitis B "e" antigen (HBeAg) seroconversion when treated with nucleoside/nucleotide analogs are more likely to experience HBeAg seroreversion and HBV reactivation than those with natural clearance, according to a study described in the November 15, 2012, Journal of Infectious Diseases.alt

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Entecavir Alone Works as Well as Combo for First-time Hepatitis B Treatment

Treating chronic hepatitis B with entecavir (Baraclude) alone worked as well as dual therapy using entecavir plus tenofovir (Viread) for patients starting treatment for the first time, according to a study described in the September 2012 issue of Gastroenterology. alt

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