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AASLD 2012: Tenofovir Safe and Effective for Long-term Hepatitis B Treatment with Little Bone Loss

Tenofovir (Viread) continues to be safe and highly effective for treating chronic hepatitis B through 8 years of follow-up, researchers reported at the 63rd Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD 2012) this week in Boston. Another study showed minimal bone loss among tenofovir-treated patients using the FRAX method. alt

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Coverage of the 2012 AASLD Liver Meeting

HIVandHepatitis.com coverage of the 63rd Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD 2012) in Boston, November 9-13, 2012.

Conference highlights include treatment for hepatitis B and C, new direct-acting HCV drugs, interferon-free hepatitis C therapy, management of liver disease complications, HIV/HBV and HIV/HCV coinfection, and prevention and treatment of hepatocellular carcioma.

Full listing by topic

HIVandHepatitis.com AASLD 2012 conference section

11/13/12

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Registry Data Show Hepatitis B Medications Appear Safe during Pregnancy

An analysis of data from the Antiretroviral Pregnancy Registry found no evidence that pregnant women's use of drugs to treat chronic hepatitis B -- including lamivudine (Epivir) and tenofovir (Viread) -- is associated with birth defects, according to a report in the November 2012 Journal of Hepatology. alt

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Antiviral Therapy Safe and Effective for Hep B Patients with Advanced Cirrhosis

Antiviral drugs including entecavir (Baraclude), lamivudine (Epivir-HBV), telbivudine (Tyzeka), and tenofovir (Viread) are generally well-tolerated and effective against hepatitis B virus (HBV) in people with liver cirrhosis, and may lower mortality even among patients with severe decompensated cirrhosis, according to 2 recently published studies.alt

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Resources for People with HIV and Hepatitis and Providers in Disaster Areas

During disasters such as Hurricane Sandy, people with chronic medical conditions including HIV and viral hepatitis will be among those displaced and requiring emergency care. Government agencies offer a number of resources for people with these and other chronic conditions, healthcare providers, and others who provide emergency and disaster-related services.

[Editor's note: This resource list will be updated as further information becomes available.]
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