Back HIV/AIDS Epidemiology

HIV/AIDS Epidemiology & Mortality

AIDS 2016: New HIV Infections Have Stopped Declining Worldwide, Now Rising in Some Regions

After a decade of rapidly declining HIV incidence following the introduction of effective antiretroviral treatment, progress in reducing new infections has stalled worldwide and in some areas incidence has started to increase, according to a new analysis from the Global Burden of Disease Study presented at the 21st International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2016) last month in Durban and published in the August 2016 edition of The Lancet HIV.

alt

Read more:

Denmark Shows Success of HIV Treatment as Prevention Among Gay Men

A study by researchers at the University of California at Los Angeles and Copenhagen University Hospital provides the first unambiguous evidence of a link between high rates of viral suppression among gay men and falling HIV incidence, or the proportion of men who catch HIV each year.

alt

Read more:

U.S. On Course to End Its HIV Epidemic -- Eventually

If current trends continue, the U.S. may eventually end its HIV epidemic, a mathematical model recently published in AIDS and Behavior shows. In 2009, the average number of people each person with HIV would infect during their lifetime fell below 1, and has now declined to 0.75, the model shows. This means the number of people living with HIV will eventually start to shrink, as more aging HIV-positive people start to die than new people getting infected. For the moment, however, since mortality among people with HIV also continues to fall, the number of people living with the virus continues to grow slowly.

alt

Read more:

HIV Prevalence and New Infections Highest Among Gay Men in Southern U.S.

The burden of HIV in the U.S. is disproportionately high for gay and bisexual men -- who account for about two-thirds of all newly diagnosed infections each year -- and HIV prevalence and new infections among men who have sex with men (MSM) is highest in states in the southeast, according to a new analysis published recently in the Journal of Medical and Internet Research -- Public Health and Surveillance.

alt

Read more:

Model Suggests There Are Fewer People with HIV in U.S. and More on Treatment

A study comparing recorded diagnoses of HIV with subsequent records of viral load and CD4 T-cell tests suggests that the number of people living with HIV in the U.S. could have been overestimated by as much as 45% -- and the proportion who are on antiretroviral therapy (ART) with undetectable viral loads could have been underestimated by as much as 50%. There could be as few as 820,000 people with HIV in the U.S. compared with the normally accepted figure of 1.2 million -- and up to 55% of those could be on ART and virally suppressed, compared with the most commonly quoted figure of 30%.

alt

Read more: