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Fibrosis & Cirrhosis

DDW 2014: Drinking More Coffee Is Associated with Less Liver Fibrosis

People with hepatitis C who drink more cups of coffee per day may have a lower likelihood of developing advanced liver fibrosis or cirrhosis -- but only if it contains caffeine, and tea does not appear to have a similar effect, according to a study presented at the Digestive Disease Week (DDW 2014) meeting this week in Chicago.

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Even Moderate Alcohol Use Raises Liver Fibrosis Risk in HIV/HCV Coinfected People

People with HIV alone or hepatitis C virus alone were more likely to have advanced liver fibrosis if they drank more alcohol, but people coinfected with both HIV and HCV had a greater risk of advanced fibrosis even with moderate or "non-hazardous" drinking, according to a report in the May 15 edition of Clinical Infectious Diseases.

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AASLD 2013: Aspirin and Cenicriviroc May Help Reduce Liver Fibrosis

Hepatitis C patients who took low-dose aspirin after liver transplantation experienced slower fibrosis progression, researchers reported at the AASLD Liver Meeting this month in Washington, DC. Two other studies showed that cenicriviroc -- a drug being developed for HIV treatment that blocks both CCR5 and CCR2 cell surface receptors -- had anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic activity in mice and rats.

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Can Coffee Help Prevent Liver Fibrosis?

There is good evidence that coffee has a beneficial effect in people at risk for liver fibrosis and there are plausible biological mechanisms to explain why, according to an editorial in the January 27 advance online edition of Hepatology. However, the amount needed to see such an effect may be too high for many people to tolerate, they cautioned.

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Coverage of the 2013 AASLD Liver Meeting

HIVandHepatitis.com coverage of the 64th Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD 2013) in Boston, November 1-5, 2013.

Conference highlights include treatment for hepatitis B and C, new direct-acting HCV drugs, interferon-free hepatitis C therapy, management of liver disease complications, HIV/HBV and HIV/HCV coinfection, and prevention and treatment of hepatocellular carcioma.

Full listing by topic

10/30/13

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