Back HCV Disease Progression Fibrosis/Cirrhosis

Fibrosis & Cirrhosis

AASLD 2015: Coffee Linked to Reduced Liver Fibrosis in People with HBV, HCV, and NAFLD

Drinking coffee was associated with lower liver stiffness -- a non-invasive measure used to estimate liver fibrosis -- in people with hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), researchers reported at the 2015 AASLD Liver Meeting last week in San Francisco. The study also showed a trend toward less liver fat build-up in people with NAFLD.alt

Read more:

Coverage of the 2015 AASLD Liver Meeting

HIVandHepatitis.com coverage of the 2015 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD) Liver Meeting in San Francisco, November 13-17, 2015.

Conference highlights include interferon-free therapy for hepatitis C, treatment for difficult-to-treat populations including people with HCV genotype 3 and liver  cirrhosis, hepatitis B prevention and treatment, and management of advanced liver disease.

Full listing by topic

Liver Meeting website

11/23/15

alt

AASLD 2015: People with Cirrhosis Cured of Hepatitis C Still Have Elevated Liver Cancer Risk

The burden of liver cancer and cirrhosis caused by hepatitis C virus (HCV) is likely to continue to grow in the U.S. despite curative treatment, and people who have cirrhosis at the time they are cured of hepatitis C will require long-term monitoring for liver cancer, studies presented this week at the AASLD Liver Meeting in San Francisco show.

alt

Read more:

AASLD 2015: Liver Fibrosis Improves after Successful Treatment for Chronic Hepatitis C

A majority of chronic hepatitis C patients with advanced fibrosis or cirrhosis showed improvement in liver health following treatment, according to study findings presented at the 2015 AASLD Liver Meeting this week in San Francisco. However, the researchers identified few demographic, laboratory, or disease-related factors that could predict who would experience fibrosis regression and who would have worsening liver damage.

alt

Read more:

Liver Cirrhosis Is More Common in U.S. than Previously Believed

New estimates indicate that more than 600,000 people in the U.S. have liver cirrhosis -- about 200,000 more than previously thought -- according to a study published online in the Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology. Cirrhosis was associated with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, heavy alcohol use, and diabetes.

alt

Read more: