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HCV Disease Progression

AASLD 2014: HIV Positive People Have High Survival Rates After Liver Transplants Due to HCC

People with HIV -- most of whom were coinfected with hepatitis B or C -- generally had good outcomes after liver transplantation due to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), with 5-year survival rates similar to those of HIV negative transplant recipients and better than those of people who underwent other types of liver cancer treatment, researchers reported at the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD) Liver Meeting this week in Boston.

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IDWeek 2014: Age, Sex, and Race Predict Spontaneous Hepatitis C Virus Clearance

African-Americans, men, and older people were less likely to experience natural hepatitis C virus (HCV) clearance without treatment, according to findings presented at IDWeek 2014 last week in Philadelphia. Overall, out of more than 1000 people with newly reported HCV infection, 15% spontaneously cleared the virus.

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CROI 2014: How Fast Does Fibrosis Progress in Acute Hepatitis C Patients with and without HIV?

Liver disease was found to progress slowly in studies of both HIV negative people with newly acquired hepatitis C virus (HCV) and HIV/HCV coinfected people with acute HCV, according to a pair of studies presented at the recent Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections.

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HCV Genotype 3, Hispanic Ethnicity Linked to Higher Risk of Cirrhosis, Liver Cancer

People with hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 3 are more likely to progress to liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) compared to people with other genotypes, according to a recent report. A related study found that people of Hispanic/Latino ethnicity are also more likely to develop advanced liver disease.

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DDW 2014: Drinking More Coffee Is Associated with Less Liver Fibrosis

People with hepatitis C who drink more cups of coffee per day may have a lower likelihood of developing advanced liver fibrosis or cirrhosis -- but only if it contains caffeine, and tea does not appear to have a similar effect, according to a study presented at the Digestive Disease Week (DDW 2014) meeting this week in Chicago.

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