Back HCV Disease Progression

HCV Disease Progression

AASLD 2016: Portal Hypertension Less Likely to Improve After HCV Treatment When Fibrosis Is Severe

Curing hepatitis C infection moderately reduces portal hypertension, but has less impact for people with more severe liver stiffness due to fibrosis, Spanish researchers reported at the 2016 AASLD Liver Meeting this month in Boston.

alt

Read more:

Coverage of the 2016 AASLD Liver Meeting

HIVandHepatitis.com coverage of the 2016 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD) Liver Meeting in Boston, November 11-15, 2016.

Conference highlights include direct-acting antiviral therapy for difficult-to-treat people with hepatitis C, novel hepatitis B agents, complications of viral hepatitis, and NAFLD/NASH.

Full listing by topic

Liver Meeting 2016 website

11/20/16

alt

EASL 2016: People Treated for Hepatitis C Have Unexpectedly High Rate of Liver Cancer Recurrence

Hepatitis C patients with cirrhosis who were treated with direct-acting antivirals had about twice the expected likelihood of developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), with the excess risk seen in people with a previous history of HCC, according to research presented at the recent European Association for the Study of the Liver's International Liver Congress (EASL 2016) in Barcelona. These findings underline the importance of ongoing liver cancer monitoring even after successful hepatitis C treatment.

alt

Read more:

HIV Coinfection Not a Risk Factor for Liver Fibrosis Progression in People with Hepatitis C

HIV coinfection is not associated with accelerated progression of liver fibrosis in people with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, according to U.S. research published in the October 15 edition of the Journal of Infectious Diseases. Factors linked with fibrosis progression were low fibrosis stage at baseline and flares in alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels.

alt

Read more:

EASL 2016: Sofosbuvir/ Ledipasvir for 6 Weeks Cures Acute Hepatitis C in HIV-Negative People

A regimen of sofosbuvir/ledipasvir (Harvoni) taken for 6 weeks cured all patients with genotype 1 acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, including those with high viral loads, according to findings from a German study presented this week at the 2016 EASL International Liver Congress in Barcelona. The researchers said treating hepatitis C early with a short regimen would improve symptoms sooner, prevent HCV transmission, and cost less than treatment initiated during chronic infection.

alt

Read more: