Back HCV Disease Progression Liver Cancer/HCC

Liver Cancer/HCC

HCV Genotype 3, Hispanic Ethnicity Linked to Higher Risk of Cirrhosis, Liver Cancer

People with hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 3 are more likely to progress to liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) compared to people with other genotypes, according to a recent report. A related study found that people of Hispanic/Latino ethnicity are also more likely to develop advanced liver disease.

alt

Read more:

Everolimus Did Not Improve Survival for Advanced Liver Cancer Patients

The mTOR inhibitor everolimus (Afinator) failed to increase overall survival for people with advanced hepatocellular carccinoma (HCC) who were previously unsuccessfully treated with sorafenib, according to results from the EVOLVE-1 trial published in the July 2 edition of JAMA.

alt

Read more:

AASLD 2013: Liver Meeting Ends with Hepatitis C Debrief and the Future of Treatment

The final day of AASLD Liver Meeting, recently held in Washington, DC, featured an overview of the status of new hepatitis C therapies, similarities between HCV and HIV, and a look towards the future of hepatitis C treatment. The development of next-generation HCV drugs has been remarkably rapid and experts agree that it may soon be possible to cure all patients with hepatitis C, but access is likely to be a challenge.

alt

Read more:

EASL 2014: New Research Sheds Light on Liver Cancer Diagnosis, Staging, and Treatment

Dramatic regional differences in survival rates for people with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are largely attributable to varying national policies regarding screening and treatment, according to study findings presented at the 49thEASL International Liver Congress last week in London. Related research showed that percutaneous radiofrequency ablation is effective for treating single liver cancer tumors.

alt

Read more:

AASLD 2013: Hepatitis C Treatment Reduces Liver Cancer and Death, But Most Remain Untreated

Hepatitis C treatment that leads to viral suppression significantly reduces the likelihood of liver disease progression and liver-related mortality, but most patients remain untreated, according to a presentation at the 64th AASLD Liver Meeting last week in Washington, DC. Other studies found that a growing proportion of liver transplants are due to hepatocellular carcinoma, which can still occur even after treatment.

alt

Read more: