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HCV Policy & Advocacy

EASL 2014: European Liver Specialists Recommend Use of Newest Hepatitis C Drugs

The European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) has issued new guidelines for the treatment of hepatitis C, which recommend that wherever possible, patients should be treated with the newest direct-acting antivirals. The guidelines also recommend physicians should "mix and match" antivirals from different companies to get the most potent regimens.

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EASL 2014: WHO Recommends Global Use of Newest Hepatitis C Drugs, Urges Price Reductions

The World Health Organization has issued global treatment guidelines for hepatitis C, strongly recommending the use of the new direct-acting antivirals sofosbuvir (Sovaldi) with ribavirin for HCV genotypes 1, 2, 3, and 4, or simeprevir (Olysio) with pegylated interferon interferon and ribavirin for genotype 1 infection. The WHO guidelines were released to coincide with the 49th International Liver Congress this week in London. New guidelines from the European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) will be released on Saturday.

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Doctors & Advocates Demand Better Health Coverage for HIV & Hepatitis

Coverage of preferred drugs in treatment guidelines, access to expert providers, lower co-pays, and clarity about patient assistance programs are among the steps HIV medical providers and patient advocates recommend to ensure that people with HIV and hepatitis C receive adequate care and treatment under the Affordable Care Act, according to separate statements released this week.alt

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U.S. Government Releases Updated Viral Hepatitis Action Plan

On April 3 the federal government released its latest 3-year update to the Action Plan for the Prevention, Care and Treatment of Viral Hepatitis (initially launched in 2011), which provides a framework for strengthening the nation's response to hepatitis B and C.

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IAS 2013: Experts Discuss Role of Drug Policy in HIV, Hepatitis, and TB Epidemics

International drug policy must shift from prohibition to public health in order to reduce harms to individuals and societies, including fueling the spread of HIV, hepatitis, and tuberculosis, experts from a range of disciplines agreed at 2 sessions held during the 7th IAS Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention (IAS 2013) this week in Kuala Lumpur.alt

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