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HCV Epidemiology & Mortality

Hepatitis C Epidemic in North America Peaked Between 1940 and 1965

The spread of hepatitis C virus (HCV) in North America peaked between 1940 and 1965, according to research published in the March 30 advance edition of Lancet Infectious Diseases. The investigators attribute the rapid spread of the infection to hospital transmissions and reuse of medical injection equipment rather than risky behaviors such as injection drugs, unsafe tattooing, and unprotected sex.

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IDWeek 2015: Hepatitis C Mortality Continues to Increase in the U.S.

Deaths related to hepatitis C virus (HCV) continue to rise in the U.S. despite the advent of highly effective interferon-free therapy, according to a CDC study presented yesterday at IDWeek 2015 in San Diego. While death certificate data indicate that hepatitis C is the most common infectious disease cause of death -- exceeding HIV, hepatitis B, and tuberculosis combined -- HCV-related mortality is likely underestimated.

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Hepatitis C Rising -- Especially Among Young People -- and May Be Underestimated

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Division of Viral Hepatitis has released its 2013 Viral Hepatitis Surveillance Report, providing the latest data on hepatitis A, B, and C in the U.S. While hepatitis C has traditionally been predominant among Baby Boomers, the new report shows that HCV incidence is rising fastest among young people. But a recently published related study suggests that formal surveillance methods may grossly underestimate the number of people newly infected with HCV.

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Latest San Francisco Annual Report Shows Drop in New HIV Infections and Deaths

Newly diagnosed HIV infections and deaths among people living with HIV in San Francisco reached new lows in 2014, and the city continues to do a better job helping people get people tested and treated than the nation as a whole. But some notable disparities persist with regard to race, age, gender identity, and homelessness, according to the SF Department of Public Health's latest HIV Epidemiology Annual Report.

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New Treatments Could Dramatically Reduce Hepatitis C Burden

Widespread screening and use of new direct-acting antivirals could make hepatitis C a rare disease within the next 2 decades, according to results from a mathematical modeling study published in the August 5 edition of Annals of Internal Medicine. Universal screening and treatment could prevent more than 161,000 liver-related deaths, they projected.

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