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HCV Epidemiology & Mortality

New Hepatitis C Infections in U.S. Tripled Over Past 5 Years, CDC Says

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released new data last week showing that the number of new hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections reported to the agency nearly tripled between 2010 and 2015. A related study saw a rising rate of hepatitis C among pregnant women -- increasing the likelihood of mother-to-child HCV transmission -- while another showed that many states are not doing all they could to reduce new infections.

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EASL 2017: WHO Releases Global Hepatitis Report

An estimated 325 million people worldwide are living with chronic hepatitis B or hepatitis C, according to a new report from the World Health Organization (WHO) released at the EASL International Liver Congress last month in Amsterdam.Most lack access to testing and treatment, and therefore are at risk for liver disease progression, liver cancer, and death.

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Viral Hepatitis Is Now A Major Global Cause of Death, Exceeding HIV and TB

Hepatitis B and C have become leading causes of death and disability worldwide, as other major communicable diseases such as HIV/AIDS, malaria, and tuberculosis (TB) have come under better control, according to an analysis published in the July 8 online edition of The Lancet.

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CROI 2017: New HCV Infections Among HIV+ Gay Men Drop By Half After DAA Roll-Out in Netherlands

A little more than a year after the Netherlands instituted a policy allowing unrestricted access to direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) for the hepatitis C treatment, researchers have already seen a dramatic decline in acute HCV infections among one at-risk population, HIV-positive men who have sex with men, according to findings reported at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections this week in Seattle. 

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Hepatitis C Kills More People than Any Other Infectious Disease, CDC Says

The number of deaths due to hepatitis C is at an all-time high in the U.S. and exceeds those attributable to 60 other infectious diseases including HIV and tuberculosis, according to new surveillance data released this week by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). However, a related Italian study found that hepatitis C patients who are successfully treated have a life expectancy similar to that of the general population.

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