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HCV Epidemiology & Mortality

New Treatments Could Dramatically Reduce Hepatitis C Burden

Widespread screening and use of new direct-acting antivirals could make hepatitis C a rare disease within the next 2 decades, according to results from a mathematical modeling study published in the August 5 edition of Annals of Internal Medicine. Universal screening and treatment could prevent more than 161,000 liver-related deaths, they projected.

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EASL 2014: Treatment as Prevention for Drug Users Could Slash HCV Prevalence

A combination of increased testing, improved linkage to care, and earlier treatment with interferon-free regimens has the potential to substantially reduce the incidence and prevalence of hepatitis C among people who inject drugs in France over the next 10 years, as well as reducing the burden of disease arising from cirrhosis over 40 years, according to a study presented at the 49th EASL International Liver Congress (EASL 2014) last week in London.

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Deaths Due to Hepatitis C Likely Undercounted

Hepatitis C is "under-documented" on death certificates of people who die with the disease, according to a report in the February 12 advance edition of Clinical Infectious Diseases. Only about 20% of people with HCV-related chronic liver disease had this listed as a cause of death, even though a majority had evidence of moderate or advanced liver fibrosis. A related study in New York City found that people with hepatitis C were at increased risk of dying, and of dying at younger ages.

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New U.S. Hepatitis C Survey Suggests Lower Prevalence, Higher Mortality

An estimated 2.7 million people in the U.S. have chronic hepatitis C, substantially lower than previous estimates, according to an analysis from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey(NHANES) published in the March 4 edition of Annals of Internal Medicine. This figure may be an underestimate, however, as the household survey does not include higher-risk populations including homeless and incarcerated people.

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Hepatitis C Prevalence Varies Widely among U.S. Latino Populations

Hepatitis C occurs at different rates in different Latino and Hispanic groups in the U.S., being highest among Puerto Rican men (nearly 12%) and lowest among South American men (0.4%), according to a report in the January 13, 2014, advance edition of the Journal of Infectious Diseases.

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