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HCV Epidemiology & Mortality

CROI 2017: New HCV Infections Among HIV+ Gay Men Drop By Half After DAA Roll-Out in Netherlands

A little more than a year after the Netherlands instituted a policy allowing unrestricted access to direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) for the hepatitis C treatment, researchers have already seen a dramatic decline in acute HCV infections among one at-risk population, HIV-positive men who have sex with men, according to findings reported at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections this week in Seattle. 

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Viral Hepatitis Is Now A Major Global Cause of Death, Exceeding HIV and TB

Hepatitis B and C have become leading causes of death and disability worldwide, as other major communicable diseases such as HIV/AIDS, malaria, and tuberculosis (TB) have come under better control, according to an analysis published in the July 8 online edition of The Lancet.

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Hepatitis C Epidemic in North America Peaked Between 1940 and 1965

The spread of hepatitis C virus (HCV) in North America peaked between 1940 and 1965, according to research published in the March 30 advance edition of Lancet Infectious Diseases. The investigators attribute the rapid spread of the infection to hospital transmissions and reuse of medical injection equipment rather than risky behaviors such as injection drugs, unsafe tattooing, and unprotected sex.

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Hepatitis C Kills More People than Any Other Infectious Disease, CDC Says

The number of deaths due to hepatitis C is at an all-time high in the U.S. and exceeds those attributable to 60 other infectious diseases including HIV and tuberculosis, according to new surveillance data released this week by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). However, a related Italian study found that hepatitis C patients who are successfully treated have a life expectancy similar to that of the general population.

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IDWeek 2015: Hepatitis C Mortality Continues to Increase in the U.S.

Deaths related to hepatitis C virus (HCV) continue to rise in the U.S. despite the advent of highly effective interferon-free therapy, according to a CDC study presented yesterday at IDWeek 2015 in San Diego. While death certificate data indicate that hepatitis C is the most common infectious disease cause of death -- exceeding HIV, hepatitis B, and tuberculosis combined -- HCV-related mortality is likely underestimated.

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