Back HCV-Related Conditions

HCV-Related Conditions

Coverage of the 2016 AASLD Liver Meeting

HIVandHepatitis.com coverage of the 2016 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD) Liver Meeting in Boston, November 11-15, 2016.

Conference highlights include direct-acting antiviral therapy for difficult-to-treat people with hepatitis C, novel hepatitis B agents, complications of viral hepatitis, and NAFLD/NASH.

Full listing by topic

Liver Meeting 2016 website

11/20/16

alt

Hepatitis C Associated with Increased Risk of Head and Neck Cancers

Infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) is associated with an increased risk of head and neck cancers, U.S. investigators reported recently in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. The risk of certain cancers was especially high for patients who were also infected with human papillomavirus (HPV). Overall, hepatitis C was associated with an almost 3-fold increase in the risk of head and neck cancers.

alt

Read more:

Cardiovascular Disease Risk Is Higher for People with Hepatitis C

People with hepatitis C are at higher risk of dying from cardiovascular disease, having a stroke, or developing other cardiovascular problems than people with similar risk factors for heart disease who do not have hepatitis C, a meta-analysis of published studies has shown. The findings, published in the January 2016 edition of Gastroenterology, come from a meta-analysis of 22 epidemiological studies conducted in Italy.

alt

Read more:

Direct-Acting Antivirals Reduce Cryoglobulinemia in People with Hepatitis C

Treatment with direct-acting antivirals not only cures people of hepatitis C, but can also rapidly reduce the severity of one of the most troublesome extra-hepatic manifestations of the disease, a study published in the February edition of Hepatology shows.

alt

Read more:

Hepatitis C Linked to Increased Risk of Parkinson's Disease, Studies Show

People with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection may be more likely to develop Parkinson's disease, especially when combined with other risk factors, though the reason for the association is not fully understood, according to a pair of recently published studies from Taiwan.

alt

Read more: