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HCV-Related Conditions

Direct-Acting Antivirals Reduce Cryoglobulinemia in People with Hepatitis C

Treatment with direct-acting antivirals not only cures people of hepatitis C, but can also rapidly reduce the severity of one of the most troublesome extra-hepatic manifestations of the disease, a study published in the February edition of Hepatology shows.

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Cardiovascular Disease Risk Is Higher for People with Hepatitis C

People with hepatitis C are at higher risk of dying from cardiovascular disease, having a stroke, or developing other cardiovascular problems than people with similar risk factors for heart disease who do not have hepatitis C, a meta-analysis of published studies has shown. The findings, published in the January 2016 edition of Gastroenterology, come from a meta-analysis of 22 epidemiological studies conducted in Italy.

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Coverage of the 2015 AASLD Liver Meeting

HIVandHepatitis.com coverage of the 2015 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD) Liver Meeting in San Francisco, November 13-17, 2015.

Conference highlights include interferon-free therapy for hepatitis C, treatment for difficult-to-treat populations including people with HCV genotype 3 and liver  cirrhosis, hepatitis B prevention and treatment, and management of advanced liver disease.

Full listing by topic

Liver Meeting website

11/23/15

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Hepatitis C Linked to Increased Risk of Parkinson's Disease, Studies Show

People with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection may be more likely to develop Parkinson's disease, especially when combined with other risk factors, though the reason for the association is not fully understood, according to a pair of recently published studies from Taiwan.

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EASL 2015: People with Hepatitis C Have Higher Cancer Rates, Even When Excluding Liver Cancer

Hepatitis C patients in the Kaiser Permanente Southern California health maintenance organization had significantly increased cancer rates compared to members without HCV infection, and this remained the case even after accounting for liver cancer, which showed the greatest excess risk, researchers reported at the European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) 50th International Liver Congress last month in Vienna.

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