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Coverage of the 2014 AASLD Liver Meeting

HIVandHepatitis.com coverage of the 65th Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD 2014) in Boston, November 7-11, 2014.

Conference highlights include new interferon-free therapy for hepatitis C -- including options for people with cirrhosis, and liver transplant recipients -- treatment for hepatitis B, and prevention and management of advanced liver disease.

Full listing by topic

The Liver Meeting website

12/2/14

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Coverage of the 2014 AASLD Liver Meeting

HIVandHepatitis.com coverage of the 65th Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD 2014) in Boston, November 7-11, 2014.

Conference highlights include new interferon-free therapy for hepatitis C -- including options for people with cirrhosis, and liver transplant recipients -- treatment for hepatitis B, and prevention and management of advanced liver disease.

Full listing by topic

The Liver Meeting website

12/2/14

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Coverage of the 2013 AASLD Liver Meeting

HIVandHepatitis.com coverage of the 64th Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD 2013) in Washington, DC, November 1-5, 2013.

Conference highlights include treatment for hepatitis B and C, new direct-acting HCV drugs, interferon-free hepatitis C therapy, management of liver disease complications, HIV/HBV and HIV/HCV coinfection, and prevention and treatment of hepatocellular carcioma.

Full listing by topic

10/30/13

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Hepatitis C May Increase Risk of Strokes

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection significantly increases the likelihood of having a stroke, but further information is needed to understand underlying mechanisms and identify related risk factors such as HCV genotype, according to a meta-analysis described in the November 12, 2013, edition of PLoS ONE.

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IAS 2013: Studies Look at Second-Line Bone Changes, Fractures, and HIV- and HCV-Related Bone Loss

People with HIV experience less bone loss if they switch to a NRTI-sparing second-line regimen containing raltegravir, researchers reported last week at the 7th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention (IAS 2013) this week in Kuala Lumpur. Other studies showed that HIV infection is associated with increased risk of hip fractures and shed light on different mechanisms of bone loss associated with HIV and hepatitis C.

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