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EASL 2015: Reinfection after HCV Cure - Long-term Support Needed for People Who Have Injected Drugs

Reinfection rates after a hepatitis C cure among people who inject drugs, as well as past drug users, are relatively low, according to findings from studies from Norway and Canada presented at the European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) 50th International Liver Congress in Vienna in April. The findings suggest that current and former injection drug users who have been cured of hepatitis C require ongoing support to remain free of HCV, but also indicate that fears of a high rate of reinfection should not be used as a reason to withhold hepatitis C treatment from people who inject drugs.

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Report Looks at Global State of Harm Reduction for People Who Inject Drugs

Harm Reduction International this month released the latest edition of its Global State of Harm Reduction report, mapping responses to drug-related HIV, hepatitis C, and tuberculosis epidemics around the world. The report looks at prevention interventions by region, including needle and syringe programs, opioid substitution therapy, harm reduction in prisons, overdose response, and access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) for people who inject drugs.

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Health and Human Rights Advocates Call for Repeal of Syringe Funding Ban

More than 140 organizations involved in HIV and viral hepatitis advocacy, public health, harm reduction, and human rights sent an open letter last week calling on legislators to lift the federal ban on funding for needle and syringe exchange programs intended to curb the transmission of blood-borne diseases among people who inject drugs.

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HIV and Hepatitis C Risk Factors and Prevention Among People Who Inject Drugs

More than half of young injection drug users in the U.S. shared syringes previously used by others and a large majority reported unprotected sex, according to the latest data on people who inject drugs from the National HIV Behavioral Surveillance System, published in the July 4 edition of Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report Surveillance Summaries. The survey found that 9% had HIV and 41% had hepatitis C.

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EASL 2014: Treatment as Prevention for Drug Users Could Slash HCV Prevalence

A combination of increased testing, improved linkage to care, and earlier treatment with interferon-free regimens has the potential to substantially reduce the incidence and prevalence of hepatitis C among people who inject drugs in France over the next 10 years, as well as reducing the burden of disease arising from cirrhosis over 40 years, according to a study presented at the 49th EASL International Liver Congress (EASL 2014) last week in London.

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