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EASL 2014: Treatment as Prevention for Drug Users Could Slash HCV Prevalence

A combination of increased testing, improved linkage to care, and earlier treatment with interferon-free regimens has the potential to substantially reduce the incidence and prevalence of hepatitis C among people who inject drugs in France over the next 10 years, as well as reducing the burden of disease arising from cirrhosis over 40 years, according to a study presented at the 49th EASL International Liver Congress (EASL 2014) last week in London.

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CROI 2014: Monkey Studies Confirm Validity of Injectable PrEP

Two studies in monkeys of an injectable formulation of the third-generation integrase inhibitor drug GSK1265744 (or GSK744LA, where LA stands for "long-acting") have strengthened the evidence that it may work as pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) in humans, researchers reported at the 21st Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2014) this week in Boston. A Phase 2 study in humans will be starting soon.

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CROI 2014: HIV in People Who Use Drugs [VIDEO]

Despite ample evidence that syringe exchange and opiate substitution therapy work to help prevent transmission of HIV and viral hepatitis, access remains "woefully inadequate" in most parts of the world, Adeeba Kamarulzaman from the University of Malaya said during her plenary talk at the 21st Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2014) this week in Boston.

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CROI 2014: Long-acting GSK744 Protects Monkeys against HIV-like Virus [VIDEO]

A long-acting injectable formulation of the next-generation integrase inhibitor GSK1265744 protected monkeys from infection via vaginal or anal exposure to a hybrid human-simian virus, according to 2 studies presented at the 21st Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2014) this week in Boston. These promising findings suggest this may be a future approach to pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP).

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Injection Drug Users Who Know They Have Hepatitis C Practice "Sero-Sharing"

People who inject drugs who know they are hepatitis C virus (HCV) positive are more likely to share syringes and injection equipment with others who are also infected, and less likely to do so with people who are HCV negative or unknown -- the equivalent of sexual "serosorting," according to a report in the December 15, 2013, Journal of Infectious Diseases.

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