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IHRC 2015: Opioid Substitution Therapy, Especially with Needle Exchange, Reduces Hepatitis C Transmission

A pooled analysis of 25 studies has for the first time shown good evidence that methadone and other forms of opioid substitution therapy substantially reduce new hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections, according to a report presented today at the 24th International Harm Reduction Conference in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Previously, this had been clearly demonstrated for HIV, but not hepatitis C.alt

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Sexual Transmission of HCV Is Increasing Among Gay and Bi Men with HIV

Sexual transmission of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is occurring among HIV-positive men who have sex with men, associated with receptive anal sex and non-injection drug use, and a small subset of men may be prone to recurrent infection after being cured of hepatitis C, according to a meta-analysis reported in the August 7 online edition of AIDS.

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HIV-Negative Gay Men May Be Susceptible to Sexually Transmitted Hepatitis C

Several studies have shown that hepatitis C virus (HCV) can be sexually transmitted among HIV-positive men who have sex with men, but HIV-negative gay and bisexual men may be at risk as well if they share similar risk factors, according to a report in the June 2015 Journal of Viral Hepatitis.

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IAS 2015: PrEP and the Risk of Hepatitis C Virus Infection [VIDEO]

 Are gay and bisexual men who take Truvada for HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) at greater risk for sexually transmitted hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection? Experts discussed this issue and others at a media briefing on HIV and hepatitis coinfection at the 8th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment, and Prevention last month in Vancouver.

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EASL 2015: Hepatitis C Treatment Could Cut HCV Transmission Among UK Gay Men in Half

Access to more effective hepatitis C treatment could reduce new infections among men who have sex with men in the United Kingdom by half over the next decade, according to a mathematical modeling study presented at the European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) International Liver Congress in Vienna in April.

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